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Monthly Archives: April 2011

REINING world champion Sebastian Vettel (Red Bull) took his third consecutive pole position of 2011 (and fourth in total) in qualifying for tomorrow’s Chinese Grand Prix at the Shanghai International Circuit.

Vettel’s fastest time in Q3 was 1:33.706 at an average speed of 130.122-mph, and is the fastest lap ever around the circuit. I think he’s using KERS don’t you? The McLaren’s of Jenson Button and Lewis Hamilton will line up second and third on the grid after setting times just over 0.04 seconds apart, but a full 0.7 seconds slower than the pole time of Vettel.

The rest of the top ten on the grid for the race are from fourth to tenth: Nico Rosberg (Mercedes), Fernando Alonso and Felipe Massa (both Ferrari), Jaime Alguersuari (Toro Rosso) – his best ever F1 grid slot, birthday boy Paul di Resta (Force India) – in only his third Grand Prix, Sébastien Buemi (Toro Rosso) and Vitaly Petrov (Renault).

Petrov couldn’t take part in Q3 itself even though he had made it through because his car stopped out on track with two minutes left of Q2. This caused the end of Q2 to become a mad dash amongst those drivers who weren’t guaranteed of a place in Q3. Massa’s move Sauber’s Sergio Pérez at Turn 6 in order to get some clear air wouldn’t have looked out of place in the race itself.

Those who did go out in Q2 and will fill grid places 11-17 were: Adrian Sutil (Force India), Pérez, Kamui Kobayashi (Sauber), Michael Schumacher (Mercedes), Rubens Barrichello (Williams), Nick Heidfeld (Renault) and Pastor Maldonado (Williams).

The eagle-eyed amongst you would have noticed that Mark Webber (Red Bull) hasn’t appeared yet. That’s because he didn’t even make it out of Q1! Red Bull put him on the slower hard compound tyre for his final run and he didn’t set a quick enough time to get through. Maldonado (who got into Q2 just ahead of Webber) was a full 0.347 seconds faster than the Australian, who will start a lowly 18th on the grid.

Grid places 19-24 will be filled by: Heikki Kovalainen and Jarno Trulli (both Lotus), Jérôme d’Ambrosio and Timo Glock (both Virgin) and Vitantonio Liuzzi and Narain Karthikeyan (both HRT). The 107% time in Q1 was 1:41.941, and Karthikeyan (24th and last on the grid) set a 1:40.445.

With regards to who will win, I’ll be mightily surprised if it isn’t one of Vettel, Button or Hamilton.

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SEBASTIAN VETTEL (Red Bull) won last Sunday’s Malaysia Grand Prix, stretching his run of consecutive victories to four. He has also won five of the last six races and if not for his engine failure in South Korea, this would now be one of the longest unbeaten runs in F1 history.

The reigning world champion won the 56-lap race at the Sepang International Circuit in a time of 1:37:39.832 (118.496-mph). The previous world champion, McLaren’s Jenson Button, finished second just over three seconds behind Vettel. Renault picked up their second straight podium of 2011 thanks to Nick Heidfeld’s third place. He now holds the record for most podiums without a win – 13. Vettel’s Red Bull team-mate Mark Webber set the fastest lap of the race on lap 46 with a 1:40.571 (123.280-mph) lap. Webber ended up finishing fourth.

Vettel made another good start and led the pack going into the tight and twisty first two corners. Both the Renaults (Heidfeld and Vitaly Petrov) surprised everybody by going around the outside of Turn 1 so as they could have the inside line of Turn 2. Heidfeld had shot up from sixth to second and ahead of Lewis Hamilton (McLaren), while Petrov who’d started eighth was now fifth and only just behind Button. Felipe Massa had gotten ahead of his Ferrari team-mate Fernando Alonso at the start and was now sixth, while further back Michael Schumacher (Mercedes) had risen to eighth from 11th on the grid. The big loser at the start was Webber, who without KERS had gone from third on the grid to ninth by the time everybody made it to Turn 4.

On lap five, Red Bull radioed Vettel telling him: “There might be rain in the next half-hour.” This turned out to be wrong in the grand scheme of things. There was moisture during the race yes, but the rain itself was nowhere to be seen. Elsewhere on the track, Massa had taken fifth place from Petrov and was again filling Fernando Alonso’s field of vision. But the Russian ran off the track at Turn 14, allowing the Spaniard through.

Meanwhile Webber was busy fighting with the Sauber of Kamui Kobayashi. The Japanese driver had passed the Aussie somewhere on lap six, but Webber re-passed him on the long back straight. However, Kobayashi used his KERS and DRS to overtake Webber again at Turn 1. It seemed like this was going to be another long afternoon for the ‘number two driver’.

At the beginning of lap 14 Vettel made his first stop after Hamilton came in to change his tyres. Later on in the lap Hamilton found himself three-wide with Schumacher and Toro Rosso’s Sébastien Buemi down the back straight. Buemi succeeded in passing Schumacher and Hamilton got by the pair of them without a scratch. Schumacher dove into the pits in the aftermath. Alonso then came in to the pits from the lead of the Grand Prix.

Three laps later Alonso (on fresh rubber) overtook Kobayashi to take third place for himself. Further up the road Vettel led Hamilton by six seconds, and with no Renaults around to slow him down this time, the Englishman set about trying to catch the German world champion.

Red Bull brought Vettel into the pits again on lap 25 for what was an excellent tyre change. Their sister team (Toro Rosso) on the other hand had to tell Buemi that he had been given a Drive-Through Penalty for speeding in the pit lane. Oops.

Lewis Hamilton stopped again, as did Alonso from the lead on lap 27. Back out on track and on new tyres, Vettel DRSed his way past Massa, and with Heidfeld having pitted as well, Vettel found himself back in the lead. However, the two McLarens were hunting him down. Hamilton and Button got close to Vettel, but then their tyres started to go off and the pair of them dropped back to the point where Hamilton needed to pit again on lap 38. Unlike Vettel, his pit-stop was slow thanks to a sickey front left wheel nut. Thanks to that holdup Hamilton was behind Button one lap later after the 2009 world champion had made his (much smoother) tyre stop.

Button began to charge and this got Red Bull worried. So in came Vettel again for new rubber. Alonso came in the pits again but on his re-entry to the track was greeted to the sight of Hamilton and Webber speeding past him into Turn 1. Webber was soon out of the picture and the stage was set for another Hamilton vs. Alonso battle.

Said battle came to a head on lap 46. Alonso was right behind Hamilton on the run down to Turn 4 and pulled his Ferrari out from behind the McLaren’s slipstream. But he did this too late and wiped his front wing across Hamilton’s right-rear tyre and back wing. Alonso needed to pit for a new nosecone but Hamilton soldiered on with a damaged car for the second race in a row.

With six laps remaining Webber DRSed Massa down the front straight and just got his Red Bull in front of the Ferrari at Turn 2. Massa tried in vain to fight back but in the end was resigned to losing his fifth place.

Two laps later Heidfeld passed Hamilton using the DRS and moved up to third. On the same lap Hamilton ran off the track at Turn 7 and lost his fourth place to Webber who just drove straight by. The damage to Hamilton’s car was costing him dearly, so the McLaren driver pitted again for new tyres and was eighth behind Alonso (sixth) and Petrov (seventh) by the time he was back on track.

Petrov’s race came to a spectacular end one lap later. He slid off the black stuff at Turn 8 and decided to get back on track at full speed. Unfortunately for the Russian he hit a drain and was launched high into the air. His Renault hit the deck with so much force that the steering column broke off in his hands. 😮 The BBC’s Martin Brundle referred to him as: “The rudderless Russian” and I personally hope that this nickname catches on.

Petrov attempts to do as Yuri Gagarin did 50 years ago.

The last few laps went without incident, meaning that Sebastian Vettel took his 12th Grand Prix victory with relative ease. Button, Heidfeld, Webber and Massa completed the top five. Alonso finished sixth and crossed the line right behind Massa, but he was given a 20 second time penalty after the race for causing his collision with Hamilton who finished seventh. At least I thought he did until I read that Hamilton had been given a 20 second penalty as well for weaving in front of Alonso. Are there any none-McLaren fans out there who agree with me in thinking that’s just so unfair? Because of this, Kobayashi was promoted to seventh with Hamilton being relegated to eighth (and losing two points to boot) :-(. Schumacher finished ninth to earn himself and Mercedes their first points of the season, and Scotland’s Paul di Resta (Force India) finished in tenth (10 seconds ahead of his team-mate Adrian Sutil) to earn his second world championship point.

After losing so much water in the Malaysian humidity, Button and Vettel are wise not to waste much of the first cool liquid they’ve had in just under two hours.

With the Chinese Grand Prix this weekend, I’m quietly confident of McLaren’s chances of success in Shanghai. Button won their last year and Red Bull will not be running KERS which will mean they’ll be missing out on all that extra power on that long straight.

DRIVERS’ CHAMPIONSHIP – After 2/19 Races.

Pos

Driver

Constructor

Points

Gap From 1st

1

Sebastian VETTEL (GER)

Red Bull

50

2

Jenson BUTTON (ENG)

McLaren

26

24

3

Lewis HAMILTON (ENG)

McLaren

22

28

4

Mark WEBBER (AUS)

Red Bull

22

28

5

Fernando ALONSO (ESP)

Ferrari

20

30

6

Felipe MASSA (BRA)

Ferrari

16

34

7

Nick HEIDFELD (GER)

Renault

15

35

8

Vitaly PETROV (RUS)

Renault

15

35

9

Kamui KOBAYASHI (JAP)

Sauber

6

44

10

Sébastien BUEMI (SWI)

Toro Rosso

4

46

11

Adrian SUTIL (GER)

Force India

2

48

12

Michael SCHUMACHER (GER)

Mercedes

2

48

13

Paul DI RESTA (SCO)

Force India

2

48

 

CONSTRUCTORS’ CHAMPIONSHIP – After 2/19 Races.

Pos

Constructor

Engine

Points

Gap From 1st

1

RED BULL (AUT)

Renault

72

2

MCLAREN (ENG)

Mercedes

48

24

3

FERRARI (ITA)

Ferrari

36

36

4

RENAULT (ENG)

Renault

30

42

5

SAUBER (SWI)

Ferrari

6

66

6

TORO ROSSO (ITA)

Ferrari

4

68

7

FORCE INDIA (IND)

Mercedes

4

68

8

MERCEDES (GER)

Mercedes

2

70

THIS very day 50 years ago (12 April 1961), humanity witnessed what at the time was its greatest achievement. Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin had just become the first human to travel into space and orbit the Earth in his rocket, Vostok 1.

Yuri Gagarin

Gagarin was born in the village of Klushino near Gzhatsk, Soviet Union (what is now Smolensk Oblast, Russia) to collective farm workers Alexey and Anna Gagarin on 9 March 1934. During the Nazi occupation of the U.S.S.R. the Gagarin house was taken over by a German officer and the family had to live in a small mud hut for 21 months. While his parents worked, young Yuri was raised by his elder sister. His two other siblings were forced into Nazi slave labour in 1943 but survived and returned home after the war.

Gagarin soon became interested in space and the planets, and often dreamt about spaceflight. He joined the Soviet air force and was soon qualified to fly light aircraft. He met his wife, Valentina Goryacheva, while he was earning his pilot’s wings which he got in a MiG-15. He became a Lieutenant just over a month after Sputnik 1 (Soviet) became the first artificial satellite to orbit the Earth and only two days after Laika (again Soviet) became the first animal in space. By 1959 he had risen to the rank of Senior Lieutenant.

One year later Gagarin was chosen along with 19 other pilots to be in the Soviet Space Programme. Spaceflight became one step closer when he was selected to be a member of the Sochi Six, from which the first cosmonauts for the Vostok programme would be chosen. Gagarin made the final two along with Gherman Titov*.

The Soviet Union’s Buzz Aldrin, Gherman Titov.

The pair had both performed well in training and their height (or rather lack of, Gagarin was only 5ft 2in or 157cm tall) meant that they could easily fit into the cramped Vostok capsule. But Gagarin also had the support of his peers. When asked to vote in secret for who they thought should pilot Vostok 1, all but three of the 20 trainee cosmonauts chose Gagarin.

Finally, he was chosen to become the first ever cosmonaut. For his name, immortality beckoned.

On the morning of 12 April 1961, Gagarin and Titov (his backup) were woken at around 5:30am and had breakfast as per normal. The night before after the final pre-flight checks the two of them relaxed like any other men. They listened to music, played pool and talked about their childhoods. They were then transported to the launch site at the Baikonur Cosmodrome (now known as Gagarin’s Start in modern day Kazakhstan). Gagarin himself was extremely calm before take-off while others around him fretted like it was going out of fashion. Just 30 minutes before launch his heart rate was just 64 beats per minute.

Gagarin in Vostok 1.

Vostok 1 launched at 06:07 UTC. “Poyekhali!” or “Off we go!” shouted Gagarin as he headed into the annals of history.

Enjoying the ride?

The single orbit itself lasted 108 minutes with a top speed of 17,400-mph at an altitude of 187.7 miles. During his flight he was promoted to major in the air force. In his post-flight report Gagarin wrote: “The feeling of weightlessness was somewhat unfamiliar compared with Earth conditions. Here, you feel as if you were hanging in a horizontal position in straps. You feel as if you are suspended.” Shortly before re-entry Gagarin calmed the fears of those on the ground by telling Moscow: “I read you well.” But the re-entry was the most dangerous part of the flight. He wasn’t out of the woods yet by any stretch of the imagination.

The Flight plan. Sorry it’s in Russian.

After a slight hic-cup over North Africa (the spacecraft hadn’t separated properly – wires were holding it in one piece) Vostok 1 split in two and Gagarin was left in the capsule experiencing around 8-10g – more than twice what a Formula 1 driver experiences.

At 07:55 UTC and 7km above ground, Gagarin ejected and free-fell until he was 2.5km from the surface when the he opened his parachute. Two schoolgirls described the capsule landing scene: “It was a huge ball, about two or three meters high. It fell, then it bounced and then it fell again. There was a huge hole where it hit the first time.

The capsule after it’s landing.

The capsule is now in the RKK Energiya museum near Moscow.

When Gagarin eventually landed south west of Engels in Saratov, the first people who came across him were a farmer and her daughter. According to Gagarin himself: “When they saw me in my space suit and the parachute dragging alongside as I walked, they started to back away in fear. I told them, don’t be afraid, I am a Soviet like you, who has descended from space and I must find a telephone to call Moscow!

After the flight Gagarin became an international celebrity. He was awarded the title Hero of the Soviet Union (the U.S.S.R.’s highest honour) along with numerous other international awards. He went to many countries around the world to promote the Soviet Union which included: Italy, Germany, Canada, Brazil, Japan, Finland and Great Britain. It is said he fondly remembered his trip to Manchester in particular.

Tragically on 27 March 1968, Gagarin was killed along with his flight instructor Vladimir Seryogin when their MiG-15UTI crashed near the town of Kirzhach. Their ashes were buried in the walls of the Kremlin in Red Square. Very recent declassified documents state that the cause of the crash was the plane being manoeuvred sharply by either Gagarin or Seryogin in order to avoid a weather balloon or entry into cloud cover.

Gagarin is still widely celebrated in Russia to this day. 12 April is both Cosmonautics Day in Russia and Yuri’s Night around the world. Today, the golden anniversary of his flight, events are taking place all over the world, with a 50-gun salute in Moscow. This is just my small tribute to him.

Since his pioneering flight, over 500 men and women from 38 different countries have gone into space. Hopefully one day I’ll join the club (if I can afford it) and if I do I’ll be thinking of Gagarin, and what it must have felt like to be the first man ever to leave our safe little blue world.

*Titov became the second man in space in August 1961 aboard Vostok 2. He was the first person to spend a day in space, sleep in space and suffer from space sickness (motion sickness in space).

Earth is the cradle of humanity, but one cannot remain in the cradle forever.” – Konstantin Tsiolkovsky, Father of rocketry.

THE reigning F1 world champion, Sebastian Vettel (Red Bull), will start the second race of the season, the Malaysia Grand Prix, from pole position. However unlike in Australia, he only just managed to secure the prime spot on the grid.

Vettel’s Q3 pole earning time was 1:34.870, lapping the Sepang International Circuit at an average speed of 130.688-mph. But for a vast majority of the 10 minute Q3 session, it looked like McLaren’s Lewis Hamilton would be on pole with a fastest time of 1:34.974. Mark Webber (Red Bull) will start from third on the grid – his fastest time was 1:35.179 – with the McLaren of Jenson Button (1:35.200) alongside him in fourth.

Fifth on the grid Fernando Alonso could only get his Ferrari around in a time of 1:35.802, a full six-tenths of a second behind Button. It looks more than likely that the race winner tomorrow will be driving either a Red Bull or a McLaren based on this gulf in speed.

The rest of the top 10 are in grid order: Nick Heidfeld (Renault), Felipe Massa (Ferrari), Vitaly Petrov (Renault), Nico Rosberg (Mercedes) and Kamui Kobayashi (Sauber).

The drivers who dropped out in Q2, and thus filling the grid slots 11-17 respectively are: Michael Schumacher (Mercedes), Sébastien Buemi and Jamie Alguersuari (both Toro Rosso), Paul di Resta (Force India), Rubens Barrichello (Williams), Sergio Pérez (Sauber) and Adrian Sutil (Force India).

Q1 was temporarily halted because Buemi’s left sidepod came off his car and landed in the road, but that still didn’t stop: Pastor Maldonado (Williams), Heikki Kovalainen and Jarno Trulli (both Lotus), Timo Glock and Jérôme d’Ambrosio (both Virgin) and the HRTs of Vitantonio Liuzzi and Narain Karthikeyan all falling at the first and being placed 18th-24th on the grid respectively.

On the contrary to last time out in Australia both HRTs made it within 107% of the fastest Q1 lap time, which here was 1:43.516. Karthikeyan’s fastest lap was 1:42.574 and was a full second slower than his own team-mate.

As I said earlier it will be either a Red Bull or a McLaren taking the victory tomorrow…but that is if we have a totally dry race. If it rains (and boy can it rain in Malaysia) the race will truly be anybodies to win or indeed lose.

REINING Formula 1 world champion Sebastian Vettel (Red Bull) got his title defence off to a perfect start by winning the opening race of this season at a canter.

The German won the 58-lap Australian Grand Prix, held at Albert Park in Melbourne, in a time of 1:29:30.259 at an average speed of 128.119-mph. Vettel led all but two laps of the race, which were led by second placed Lewis Hamilton (McLaren). Renault’s Vitaly Petrov became the first Russian ever to score a podium finish at a Grand Prix by coming home in third, and for the second race in a row managed to hold off Ferrari’s Fernando Alonso who finished just behind him in fourth. It really does make you think what might have been for Renault had Robert Kubica not nearly killed himself rallying earlier in the year doesn’t it?

Alonso’s Ferrari team-mate Felipe Massa set the fastest lap of the race on lap 55 with a 1:28.947 (133.360-mph) tour.

Before the race started, all the drivers held a minute’s silence in memory of all those who lost their lives in the recent Japanese earthquake and tsunami.

When the race (and the season) finally got underway, Vettel shot off into the lead. Mark Webber (Red Bull) also got off to a cracking start in his home race pulling ahead of Hamilton, but couldn’t hold the position because the Englishman had the inside line into Turn 1.

HERE WE GO!

Petrov also had a storming start and forced himself past Massa’s Ferrari at Turn 3. Further action took place at this point in the race, most notably Michael Schumacher (Mercedes) and Jamie Alguersuari (Toro Rosso) coming together and damaging each other’s cars, while Rubens Barrichello (Williams) took a trip into the gravel trap. Meanwhile Jenson Button (McLaren) was swarming all over the back of Massa and only just failed to pass the Brazilian around the outside of Turn 11.

Button continued to try and pass Massa, but even with the Draft Reduction System (DRS) he just couldn’t get by. To make matters worse for the 2009 world champion, the 2005 and 2006 world champion (and Massa’s team-mate), Fernando Alonso, was getting closer and closer with every passing lap.

Things came to a head on lap 11 at Turn 11. Button had succeeded in pulling alongside Massa around the outside of the corner, but had to win the position by diving onto the escape road. Button had to let Massa through, but he had slowed down so as his team-mate could get by. This now meant Button had to let both Ferrari’s pass him. This didn’t happen for one reason or another and the winner of the last two Aussie Grand Prixs was hit with a Drive-Through Penalty for cutting the course a few laps latter.

Elsewhere on the track both Red Bulls had pitted before Hamilton, but the status quo of the race was re-established after the 2008 world champion pitted.

Barrichello’s poor weekend got even worse on lap 23 when he dived up the inside of Nico Rosberg (Mercedes) at Turn 3 and hit him. Barrichello spun but kept going, but Rosberg ended up joining his team-mate Schumacher in the Mercedes garage. Not a fantastic first race of 2011 for Mercedes I must say.

This collision helped Button gain a couple of places and by the end of lap 24 he was right up behind Kamui Kobayashi’s Sauber. The McLaren driver made full use of his DRS and passed Kobayashi up the inside at Turn 1.

Eight laps later, while still well in the lead, Vettel told his Red Bull pit crew that the: “Tyres [are] starting to go off.” He pitted at the end of the lap and exited still in the lead. Second-placed Hamilton also pitted, who was having to drive carefully because the bargeboard on his McLaren had come loose and was in danger of coming off.

Webber pitted again at the end of lap 41 and released Alonso into clear air and third place. Webber knew he needed to put in a fast out-lap in order to re-pass Alonso in the pits, but slid onto the Astroturf at Turn 3 and lost time. When Alonso rejoined the track from the pits at the end of the next lap he was in fourth place behind Petrov’s Renault but ahead of Webber’s Red Bull. This is how these three would finish.

The race continued without much incident meaning that at the end of lap 58, Vettel took the checkered flag for the 11th time in his career and for the third time in as many races (the first time this has been achieved since Button did it in 2009). This was also Red Bull’s first Australian Grand Prix win.

Get used to the view Vitaly; I sense there may be many more podiums to come.

When the second (fifth placed) Red Bull of Mark Webber crossed the finish-line it was immediately parked. I still don’t know why. Jenson Button finished sixth.

The two Saubers of debutant Sergio Pérez and Kamui Kobayashi came home in seventh and eighth place respectively the team was delighted. The further fact that Pérez only stopped once for tyres and was fast enough to finish seventh must mean we have a driver with a great deal of potential on our hands again. Unfortunately Sauber’s celebrations didn’t last long. Both cars were disqualified because of a very slight technical infringement to do with the uppermost part of the rear wing. This elevated Massa to seventh, Sébastien Buemi (Toro Rosso) to eighth, and the Force India’s of Adrian Sutil and Scotland’s Paul di Resta to ninth and tenth respectively. This isn’t how di Resta probably would’ve imagined scoring a point on his F1 debut, but that is how it goes sometimes.

All in all, I was impressed with the surprising pace of the McLarens, horrified by the speed of Vettel, and very happy for Vitaly Petrov. Next stop is Malaysia and its always unpredictable climate.

Sorry this is so late, but I’ve been working on other things lately and this had to wait.

DRIVERS’ CHAMPIONSHIP – After 1/19 Races.

Pos

Driver

Constructor(s)

Points

Gap From 1st

1

Sebastian VETTEL (GER)

Red Bull

25

2

Lewis HAMILTON (ENG)

McLaren

18

7

3

Vitaly PETROV (RUS)

Renault

15

10

4

Fernando ALONSO (ESP)

Ferrari

12

13

5

Mark WEBBER (AUS)

Red Bull

10

15

6

Jenson BUTTON (ENG)

McLaren

8

17

7

Felipe MASSA (BRA)

Ferrari

6

19

8

Sébastien BUEMI (SUI)

Toro Rosso

4

21

9

Adrian Sutil (GER)

Force India

2

23

10

Paul DI RESTA (SCO)

Force India

1

24

 

CONSTRUCTORS’ CHAMPIONSHIP – After 1/19 Races.

Pos

Constructor

Engine

Points

Gap From 1st

1 

RED BULL (AUT)

Renault

35

2

MCLAREN (ENG)

Mercedes

26

9

3

FERRARI (ITA)

Ferrari

18

17

4

RENAULT (ENG)

Renault

15

20

5

TORO ROSSO (ITA)

Ferrari

4

31

6

FORCE INDIA (IND)

Mercedes

3

32

INDIA are the new Cricket world champions, having beaten fellow co-hosts Sri Lanka by six wickets in the Final in Mumbai. Unfortunately due to a work load of a more important kind than what goes on this blog, I haven’t really had the time to review the Final. This is why I’m sticking the link to the game’s Wikipedia page below so you can read about the match in much more detail. I hope this isn’t a problem for you.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2011_Cricket_World_Cup_Final

Sri Lanka vs. India

2011 Cricket World Cup (Match 49, The Final) – Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai, India

Sri Lanka won the toss and elected to bat

Sri Lanka

vs.

India

274-6 (50.0 overs @ 5.48 rpo)

Day/Night Match

277-4 (48.2 overs @ 5.73 rpo)

D.P.M. Jayawardene 103* (88)

G. Gambhir 97 (122)

Yuvraj Singh 2-49

S.L. Malinga 2-42

Man of the Match – M.S. Dhoni (India)

India won by 6 Wickets

 

India’s Yuvraj Singh was awarded ‘Player of the Tournament’ for his 362 runs (at an average of 90.50), 15 wickets (at an average of 25.13), three catches and four ‘Man of the Match’ awards.

Sri Lankan opener Tillakaratne Dilshan ended up as the top run scorer of this World Cup, with exactly 500 runs to his name at an average of 62.50. Dilshan and his opening partner Upul Tharanga made the highest partnership (282) in their group match against Zimbabwe.

Virender Sehwag (India) made the highest individual score of the tournament in the first match (Bangladesh vs. India), scoring 175 off of 140 balls. In this innings India also made the highest team score of the tournament – 370-4 at 7.40 runs per over.

With the ball, both Pakistan’s Shahid Afridi and India’s Zaheer Khan finished as the joint highest wicket takers of the competition, with 21 victims each.

West Indies Kemar Roach recorded the best individual figures in an innings, taking 6-27 against the Netherlands – Hat-Trick included.

Sri Lanka’s Kumar Sangakkara took the most dismissals of this World Cup. The wicketkeeper caught ten batsman and stumped a further four. His good friend Mahela Jayawardene took the most catches by an outfielder, with a grand total of eight.

P92: “Well that’s it for another four years. The 2015 ICC Cricket World Cup is to be co-hosted between Australia and New Zealand.

Stumpy: “It’s been fun covering this World Cup with you, and I hope England have a successful summer…apart from when Sri Lanka and India tour.

P92: “But they’re the only sides coming over to England in the summer.

Stumpy: “Exactly.