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Monthly Archives: October 2010

APOLOGIES for the delay in my Korean Grand Prix post. I’ve been off school for a week and taking it easy, plus it was such a long and eventful race that I’m still trying to get over it!

Also, being as Brazil and Abu Dhabi are back-to-back I’ve decided to kick-off the championship run in by posting my Korean GP review later in the week.

I hope this is fine with you reader, and sorry again for any inconvenience caused.

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WORLD CUP oracle Paul the Octopus has died at the age of 2 years and 10 months in his tank at the Oberhausen Sea Life Centre in Germany. He passed away peacefully in his sleep. 😦

Over the course of this summer’s FIFA World Cup in South Africa, Weymouth hatched Paul became the most famous animal on the planet. He outshone every single player and event at the tournament by predicting the winner in all seven of his adoptive country’s matches. This included Germany’s shock loss to Serbia (0-1) in their second match and their eventual elimination to Spain (also 0-1) in the Semi-Finals.

Everybody wanted to know who Paul thought would win the Final, and his prediction was broadcast live around the globe. He chose Spain over the Netherlands, and the Spanish went on to beat the Dutch 1-0 after extra-time in the Final (a.k.a. – The Battle of Johannesburg).

The odds of correctly predicating the winners in all eight matches have been given at 256/1.

It is also heavily rumoured – although denied by his keeper – that Paul correctly predicted four of Germany’s six matches in Euro 2008. He is reported to have gotten wrong Croatia’s win over Germany and Spain’s win over Germany in the Final.

Needles to say, Paul made several enemies as a result of his predictions. When Spain beat Germany the German newspaper Westfälische Rundschau accused him of betrayal. I take it they didn’t know he was English. The Spanish government then stepped in with their PM, José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero offering him safe-haven in Spain. Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad used a speech in Tehran to publicly attack Paul, saying that the west was using him as a propaganda tool. Err, Mahmoud…he’s just an Octopus.

The Sea Life Centre retired Paul the day after the Final, and presented to him his very own replica World Cup trophy and an extra portion of his favourite food – and prediction making tools – mussels.

But Paul kept himself busy in his retirement, and in August he became an official ambassador for England’s 2018 World Cup bid.

Alas, he would not live to see if his home country would be awarded the tournament. Octopuses rarely live beyond the age of 2, so he actually had a long life by his species standards.

P92: “Rest in peace Paul. You were the best thing to come out of what was a pretty dyer World Cup.”

Zakumi (from Jo’burg): “Hey it wasn’t that bad. But seriously, Paul if you can hear me up there in that big fish tank in the sky, we will miss you terribly.”

P92 (raises a full glass): “To Paul.”

Zakumi (raises glass): “Here here, to Paul.”

RIP

SEBASTIAN VETTEL (Red Bull) took pole position – his ninth of the season – for tomorrow morning’s first ever (South) Korean Grand Prix at the Korean International Circuit in Yeongam.

The young German’s Q3 pole effort was a 1:35.585 lap, an average speed of 131.556 mph.

His Championship leading team-mate, Mark Webber, will line up alongside him in yet another all Red Bull front row. Ferrari’s Fernando Alonso will start from third on the grid.

The rest of the top ten from fourth to tenth are: Lewis Hamilton (McLaren), Nico Rosberg (Mercedes), Felipe Massa (Ferrari), Jenson Button (McLaren), Robert Kubica (Renault), Michael Schumacher (Mercedes) and Rubens Barrichello (Williams).

I’m not sure what to make of the track itself, apart from the fact that the pit lane entry is not in the safest place in the world by any stretch of the imagination. All those of you who have seen it will (hopefully) agree with me.

Both the McLaren drivers (Button and Hamilton) ideally need to come first and second and hope that the other three title contenders: Webber, Alonso and Vettel finish poorly or fail to score at all in order to keep their title hopes alive. Sadly I can only see a Red Bull, namely Vettel, winning this race tomorrow morning.

We will just have to wait and see.

ONE of England’s main rivals in the race to host the 2018 FIFA World Cup has withdrawn their bid.

The U.S.A. bid team have now switched their focus entirely to bidding for the 2022 World Cup. In return England has pulled out of the running to host the 2022 World Cup and will focus on the 2018 bid.

This means that Europe will host the World Cup in 2018, with: Belgium & Netherlands, Russia and Portugal & Spain being England’s opposition.

The countries in the running for the 2022 tournament are: Australia, Japan, Qatar, South Korea and U.S.A.

Indonesia and Mexico pulled out of both races some time ago.

Personally, I’d award England the 2018 World Cup (even if I wasn’t English) and award the U.S.A. the 2022 World Cup. The last time the United States held the World Cup in 1994, the whole thing was a huge success.

FIFA will announce both the 2018 and 2022 winning bids on 2 December.

Looking even further into the future, I’d award the 2026 World Cup (if they bid and deserved it) to either China or Australia, and the 2030 World Cup (the 100th anniversary edition) to the 1930 hosts Uruguay. Why not?

SEBASTIAN VETTEL of Red Bull strengthened his championship hopes last Sunday (10 October) by taking pole position and victory at the Japanese Grand Prix at Suzuka…

...But Webber still hovers over Vettel in the Standings.

Qualifying had been washed out on Saturday because of heavy rain and took place at 10:00 local time (02:00 British time).

Vettel took pole with a Q3 time of 1:30.785 (143.072 mph). His Red Bull team-mate Mark Webber was second fastest, with Renault’s Robert Kubica taking third on the grid. The rest of the top ten from fourth to tenth were: Fernando Alonso (Ferrari), Jenson Button (McLaren), Nico Rosberg (Mercedes), Rubens Barrichello (Williams), Lewis Hamilton (McLaren) – who set the third fastest time but had his gearbox changed encoring a five-place grid drop. Nico Hülkenberg (Williams) and Michael Schumacher (Mercedes) completed the top ten.

Felipe Massa (Ferrari) had another qualifying to forget, as he could only manage 12th on the grid.

I then got just under three hours sleep before the race itself. But it was well worth getting up for.

Lucas di Grassi (Virgin) destroyed his car at 130R on the going to the grid lap of all things. Don’t ask me how he managed it. I don’t even think he knows.

The start of the race saw two separate accidents before the drivers had even gotten to the ‘S’ bends. Vitaly Petrov (Renault) cut across Hülkenberg’s path and ended up breaking both of their cars. Massa then went off the road at the first corner and bounced across the track, wiping out Vitantonio Liuzzi’s Force India. This naturally brought out the Safety Car, with Vettel leading from Kubica who has passed Webber at the start.

In Soviet Russia, car drives YOU!

We have to swap insurance details!

But we were robbed of the chance of seeing Kubica giving the Red Bulls a hard time just minutes later. On lap three (while still behind the SC) Kubica’s right-rear wheel came off of his car and he was out of the race. Thank God that this didn’t happen at oh…let’s see…130R at racing speed.

The SC came in at the end of lap six with Vettel leading from: Webber, Alonso, Button and Hamilton.

Mercedes had an eventual first racing lap. Nico Rosberg tried to pass Jamie Alguersuari (Toro Rosso) around the outside of 130R but he ran wide and lost the place. Meanwhile just a little way up the road, Michael Schumacher overtook his old Ferrari team-mate, Rubens Barrichello at Turn 15.

On lap 18, Sauber’s Kamui Kobayashi (who was driving in his home Grand Prix for the first time) launched himself up the inside of Adrian Sutil’s Force India at the ‘Hairpin’ for ninth place.

Race leader Vettel and third placed man Alonso pitted at the end of lap 24. They came out of the pits as they came in, but behind them Hamilton (who had pitted earlier) slipstreamed Kobayashi on the front straight and took fifth place off him. Webber – who inherited the lead from Vettel – pitted a lap later handing the lead over to Button.

The reigning World Champion pitted from the lead at the end of lap 38, and Vettel was back in front. On the next lap Hamilton radioed the McLaren pit wall to tell them that he had lost third gear. His lightning pace from 15 or so laps ago had gone, and it would only be a matter of time before his team-mate would pass him. This happened on lap 44. Button followed Hamilton around to the ‘Hairpin’ and eased by without Hamilton putting up a fight.

Kobayashi was at it again on lap 45, this time passing Alguersuari around the outside of the ‘Hairpin’. Alguersuari didn’t give up without a struggle however and made contact with the Sauber. But it was the Spaniard’s car which came off second best. Kobayashi was then greeted with the sight of Sutil’s Force India dumping oil all over the track. Sutil tried to take 130R too quickly and only just saved the car from a violent spin, his backside taking a huge backside out of his seat in the process. He did manage to get the car back to the pits however.

Three laps later it was Nico Rosberg’s turn to lose a wheel (his left-rear). It came off as he went up the hill to Dunlop corner after the ‘S’ bends. He had been holding off a strong challenge from his resurgent team-mate Michael Schumacher for most of the second half of the race, and he really deserved a good finish.

Schumacher (red helmet) could only pass Rosberg (yellow helmet) when his wheel came off.

The cameras then picked up the fact that Kobayashi was now ahead of Barrichello, and was right up behind his Sauber team-mate Nick Heidfeld on the start/finish straight in front of his delighted home fans. The Japanese driver then overtook his team-mate at the ‘Hairpin’ (where else?) and was now up into seventh place.

But it was Sebastian Vettel who won the 53 lap race in a time of 1:30:27.323, an average speed of 126.841 mph. His team-mate Webber came second just under a second behind him and also set the fastest lap of the race (1:33.474, 138.956 mph). Alonso came third, with Button fourth, Hamilton fifth and Schumacher sixth. Lotus managed their best result of the season with Heikki Kovalainen and Jarno Trulli finishing 12th and 13th respectively.

For his first lap actions, Petrov has been given a five-place grid penalty for the next race. This will be the first ever (South) Korean Grand Prix. McLaren must win it to save both their title challenges.

DRIVERS’ STANDINGS (16/19 GPs)

Pos

Driver

Constructor(s)

Points

Gap From 1st

1

Mark WEBBER (AUS)

Red Bull

220

2

Fernando ALONSO (ESP)

Ferrari

206

14

3

Sebastian VETTEL (GER)

Red Bull

206

14

4

Lewis HAMILTON (ENG)

McLaren

192

28

5

Jenson BUTTON (ENG)

McLaren

189

31

6

Felipe MASSA (BRA)

Ferrari

128

92*

7

Nico ROSBERG (GER)

Mercedes

122

98*

8

Robert KUBICA (POL)

Renault

114

106*

9

Michael SCHUMACHER (GER)

Mercedes

54

166*

10

Adrian SUTIL (GER)

Force India

47

173*

*Can’t win title.

There are 75 points still available

CONSTRUCTORS’ STANDINGS (16/19 GPs)

Pos

Constructor

Engine

Points

Gap From 1st

1

RED BULL (AUT)

Renault

426

2

MCLAREN (ENG)

Mercedes

381

45

3

FERRARI (ITA)

Ferrari

334

92

4

MERCEDES (GER)

Mercedes

176

250

5

RENAULT (FRA)

Renault

133

293

6

FORCE INDIA (IND)

Mercedes

60

366

7

WILLIAMS (ENG)

Cosworth

58

368

8

SAUBER (SUI)

Ferrari

37

389

9

TORO ROSSO (ITA)

Ferrari

11

415

Yet to Score

LOTUS (MAL), HRT (ESP), VIRGIN (ENG)

Cosworth (All)

0

426

*Can’t win title.

There are 129 points still available

 

 

England

0

vs.

0

Montenegro

Att. = 73,451

Euro 2012 Qualifying Group G

Ref = Manuel Gräfe (GER)

Wembley Stadium

ENGLAND could only manage a 0-0 home draw against Montenegro last night in their third Euro 2012 qualifying match.

The home-team dominated the first-half possession, but failed to do anything with it. The closest England came to scoring was when Peter Crouch only just failed to connect with a long pass from Steven Gerrard.

I could tell the game was dull because my Dad and I had started to talk about something else!

The second-half wasn’t much better. Out-of-sorts striker Wayne Rooney had a few chances, and England should have had at least one penalty. The Montenegrin keeper, Mladen Božović, produced some class saves to keep his country’s record of four clean sheets from their first four matches.

But the really scary moment came just seven minutes from the end. Milan Jovanović – who is the Montenegrin player who should have given away that penalty to England – smashed the crossbar from long range. England keeper Joe Heart was well beaten.

Not really much else to report, apart from the fact that England were rightly booed off at full-time and that they must do better in their next two games, which are friendly matches against France and Argentina.

The other match in England’s group saw Switzerland destroy hapless Wales 4-1 to earn their first points. Wales stay rooted to the bottom of the table with zero points.

Some other Euro 2012 Qualifying results

Azerbaijan 1 – 0 Turkey 😮

Kazakhstan 0 – 3 Germany

Belgium 4 – 4 Austria

Slovakia 1 – 1 Republic of Ireland

Faroe Islands 1 – 1 Northern Ireland 🙂

Italy A – A Serbia (See below)

France 2 – 0 Luxembourg 😦

Netherlands 4 – 1 Sweden

Scotland 2 – 3 Spain 🙂

The Italy vs. Serbia match had to be abandoned after just six minutes due to the trouble in the stadium being caused by the Serbian ‘fans’. Kick-off had already been delayed for 35 minutes because of crowd disturbances. Flares were thrown onto the pitch by the Serbian crowd and fireworks were launched at the Italian keeper.

Football has moved on, it’s time these thugs did as well.

Euro 2012 Qualifying Group G

Pos.

Team

P

W

D

L

GF

GA

+/-

PTS

1

Montenegro (40=)

4

3

1

0

3

0

+3

10

2

England (6)

3

2

1

0

7

1

+6

7

3

Switzerland (21)

3

1

0

2

5

5

0

3

4

Bulgaria (54)

3

1

0

2

1

5

-4

3

5

Wales (84)

3

0

0

3

1

6

-5

0

Group winners and best runner-up all qualify for the finals in Poland and Ukraine automatically. The remaining group runners-up qualify for the Play-Off round. Brackets show current FIFA World Ranking.

TODAY (10 October), Pink Floyd’s fifth studio album Atom Heart Mother is 40 years old. It was recorded from between March and August 1970 at the legendary Abbey Road Studios in London, and reached #1 in the UK album chart – the first such achievement by a Floyd album.

The album cover is a simple picture of a Cow named Lulubelle III. The picture was taken by the album cover genius that is Storm Thorgerson. The band wanted to break away from the Psychedelic Space Rock image they had been given, so they asked Thorgerson to put “something plain” on the cover.

The album itself runs for 52 minutes and 44 seconds and features five songs. The entire first side of the album is taken up by Pink Floyd’s longest uninterrupted song, Atom Heart Mother (Suite). The six part instrumental piece comes in at 23:44, and was written by all four members of Pink Floyd: Roger Waters (bass), David Gilmour (guitar), Richard Wright (keys) and Nick Mason (drums), along with composer Ron Geesin. The six parts of the suite are: Father’s Shout (0:00 – 2:54), Breast Milky (2:55 – 5:26), Mother Fore (5:27 – 10:12), Funky Dung (10:13 – 15:29), Mind Your Throats, Please (15:30 – 19:13) and Remergence (19:14 – 23:44). Also in the studio with Pink Floyd when this song was recorded where the Abbey Road Session Pops Orchestra and the John Alldis Choir. I can’t write anything other than it will blow your mind every single time you here it.

The drum and bass parts were all recorded in one take, and the piece itself actually went through a number of different working titles including: Theme From an Imaginary Western, Epic and The Amazing Pudding. The latter became the name of the Pink Floyd magazine from 1983-93. The name Atom Heart Mother (Suite) was finally decided upon when Ron Geesin gave Roger Waters a copy of the 16 July 1970 Evening Standard newspaper and told him that the song title would be in there. Waters spied an article about a pregnant woman who had been fitted with a pacemaker. The articles’ headline was: “Atom Heart Mother Named”.

Film director Stanley Kubrick wanted to use the suite for his film A Clockwork Orange but the band turned him down (but this hasn’t stopped people from making ‘what if’ videos on the internet – see below). Years later Kubrick would deny Waters audio from 2001: A Space Odyssey for his solo album Amused to Death.

The second track on the album is the Roger Waters composition If. This gentle acoustic track (in my eyes) can be seen as the embryonic stages of Waters concocting the character ‘Pink’ who would be unleashed nine years later on The Wall.

We then have the song Summer ’68 which was written and sung by late keyboardist Richard Wright. It is about a one night stand and the return to habitual life. There are also lyrics that reference the down side of touring: “My friends are lying in the sun, I wish that I was there…

But the fourth track of the album is the one that takes the biscuit. I my opinion, Fat Old Sun is the best song that David Gilmour has ever written. It starts of so gentle and peacefully, before launching into an awesome but never overblown guitar solo. Gilmour also played bass and drums in the studio for this track.

Unfortunately the last track on the album is one of the very few Pink Floyd songs that I don’t like. Alan’s Psychedelic Breakfast is more of a recorded jam session than a song. It is just plain weird. But Pink Floyd were experimenting at this time, and occasionally when you experiment you get turned an odd shade of green.

So summary, a fantastic but yet sadly overlooked album (no song off it made the ‘best of’ album sadly), with three excellent individual works and perhaps the most unique track in rock history.

I WOKE up at 4:45am to watch the qualifying session for this year’s Japanese Grand Prix at Suzuka, only to be told by my Dad that it might not happen because of torrential rain.

And sure enough, no cars went out on track at all because it was just raining too much, and the cars would handle like boats. Qualifying will now take place at 10am local time, or 2am UK time! This will give me just under three hours sleep before the live programme begins at 6am UK time, with the race starting at 7am.

This is not the first time that Suzuka has experienced qualifying on the morning of the race. Back in 2004, typhoon Ma-on caused qualifying to be pushed back a day as it came within around 25 miles of the circuit.

The weather forecast for Suzuka tomorrow is for it to be clear, but if no qualifying takes place at all, then the grid will be decided by car number order, meaning a McLaren front row lock-out!

Well no actually. The Woking based outfit have had to change Lewis Hamilton’s gearbox, and the 2008 World Champion will take a five-place grid bump. 😦

But on a lighter not as you can see below, some of the drivers and mechanics busied themselves by taking photos and racing little paper boats down the pit lane.

Sebastian Vettel trying his hand at photography

TODAY marks the 40th anniversary of the death of Janis Joplin, who I believe was and still is the greatest female rock singer of all time.

Born on 19 January 1943 in Port Arthur (Texas), she joined the band Big Brother and the Holding Company in 1966, before joining the Kozmic Blues Band and the Full Tilt Boogie Band.

Unfortunately, Janis was in with the wrong crowd during her all too short career. She died of a Heroin overdose in the Landmark Motor Hotel (now the Highland Gardens Hotel) in Los Angeles (California). The Full Tilt Boogie manager, John Cooke, believed that the heroin she took that night 40 years ago was more potent than her norm, and several of her dealer’s other customers died of overdoses the same week. But this still doesn’t mean she was right.

Janis was just 27 years-old when she died, and joined Brian Jones (Rolling Stones) and Jimi Hendrix in the 27 Club. These three would soon be joined in the club by Jim Morrison (The Doors) and Kurt Cobain (Nirvana).

Rest in Peace Janis.

FERNANDO ALONSO made it back-to-back victories for Ferrari by winning last Sunday’s (26 September) Singapore Grand Prix around the Marina Bay Street Circuit. The Spaniard won the 61 lap night race in a time of 1:57:53.579 (97.822 mph). He also set the fastest lap of the race with a 1:47.976 (105.023 mph) lap. Alonso led every lap of the race, and because he started from pole-position, he completed his first ever Grand Slam. Red Bull’s Sebastian Vettel chased Alonso hard for the entire race, finishing just 0.293 seconds behind the Ferrari. World Championship leader Mark Webber (Red Bull) finished third, thus extending his points lead.

He’s happy isn’t he?

The start saw Alonso move across the track to block any chance Vettel had of passing him into the first corner. Reigning Champion Jenson Button traded places with his McLaren team-mate Lewis Hamilton, and having started last, Felipe Massa (Ferrari) came into the pits at the end of the lap in order to get his pit stop out of the way.

On the third lap the Safety Car was deployed so as the rescue crew could fetch Vitantonio Liuzzi’s Force India by the infamous Turn 10. He had collided with the Sauber of Nick Heidfeld who was starting his first race since Abu Dhabi 2009. Several drivers took this as their opportunity to pit, including Mark Webber. But when the race got back up to speed at the end of lap five the Australian found himself down in 11th behind Timo Glock’s Virgin, which he passed with ease later on in the lap.

Webber continued to climb up the order, passing Kamui Kobayashi’s Sauber and Michael Schumacher’s Mercedes.

The next high profile action came at the end of lap 28. Lewis Hamilton pitted and Webber went though, leaving the 2008 World Champion down in eighth place.

Next time around both Alonso and Vettel pitted. Both pit crews were flawless, as was Alonso’s get away. But Vettel was in the wrong gear and almost didn’t get away at all, losing vital ground on the man he had been chasing all night.

The SC was back out on track on lap 32 after Kobayashi ended his race in the wall at Turn 18. He was then joined in the barrier by the HRT of Bruno Senna, who was going so fast he would probably have hit the wall anyway.

The race was back on at the end of lap 35 with Alonso still leading followed by: Vettel, Webber and Hamilton. But Webber had both Virgin cars in his way, and as he was lapping them Hamilton got close enough to be able to pull alongside and ahead of him on Raffles Boulevard. But on the entry to the Nicoll Highway left-hander, Webber (who was on the inside) hit Hamilton’s McLaren and broke it’s suspension. The Englishman limped into the run-off area at Turn 8 and retired from his third race in four. 😦

I was livid with Webber when I saw this happen live, but having seen it again and again, I now realise that it was a very 50/50 incident.

On lap 54 Robert Kubica (Renault) passed Massa having already seen off his team-mate Vitaly Petrov. Kubica would soon go on to pass Adrian Sutil’s Force India and Nico Hülkenberg’s Williams. For you see, he had pitted later than these drivers who had older and more worn out tyres than him, so he had a huge grip advantage.

While I’m on this group of drivers, you may have seen Sutil finish in eighth place, in front of Hülkenberg and Massa. But it was Massa who took eighth place after the results had been classified. Sutil was given a 20 seconds penalty for illegally gaining an advantage at Nicoll Highway on the first lap, and Hülkenberg was also given a 20 seconds penalty for gaining and advantage illegally after Force India complained. I thought you didn’t get time penalties for stuff that happened on lap one?

The drama was not over yet however. With just one lap to go, Heikki Kovalainen’s Lotus’s Cosworth engine burst into flames. The Finn decided it would be a bad idea to bring the car into the pits, so he parked it on the start finish straight by the pit wall. He then jumped out of the car (as you would) and bravely tackled the blaze with a fire extinguisher handed to him by someone on the pit wall.

Singaporean cuisine is harmful to Finns...Official!

Alonso and Vettel avoided this last obstacle, and the former took his 25th Grand Prix victory. This now puts him ahead of Juan Manuel Fangio (24 wins) and level with Jim Clark and Niki Lauda. The only drivers who have won more Grand Prixs than these three are: Sir Jackie Stewart (27), Nigel Mansell (31), Ayrton Senna (41), Alain Prost (51) and Michael Schumacher (91).

The next race is the Japanese Grand Prix on the weekend of the 8-9-10 October at the legendary Suzuka circuit. Will you be getting up to watch it live? I will.

DRIVERS’ STANDINGS (15/19 GPs)

Pos

Driver

Constructor(s)

Points

Gap From 1st

1

Mark WEBBER (AUS)

Red Bull

202

2

Fernando ALONSO (ESP)

Ferrari

191

11

3

Lewis HAMILTON (ENG)

McLaren

182

20

4

Sebastian VETTEL (GER)

Red Bull

181

21

5

Jenson BUTTON (ENG)

McLaren

177

25

6

Felipe MASSA (BRA)

Ferrari

128

74

7

Nico ROSBERG (GER)

Mercedes

122

80

8

Robert KUBICA (POL)

Renault

114

88

9

Adrian SUTIL (GER)

Force India

47

155*

10

Michael SCHUMACHER (GER)

Mercedes

46

156*

*Can’t win title.

There are 100 points still available

CONSTRUCTORS’ STANDINGS (15/19 GPs)

Pos

Constructor

Engine

Points

Gap From 1st

1

RED BULL (AUT)

Renault

383

2

MCLAREN (ENG)

Mercedes

359

24

3

FERRARI (ITA)

Ferrari

319

64

4

MERCEDES (GER)

Mercedes

168

215*

5

RENAULT (FRA)

Renault

133

250*

6

FORCE INDIA (IND)

Mercedes

60

323*

7

WILLIAMS (ENG)

Cosworth

56

327*

8

SAUBER (SUI)

Ferrari

27

356*

9

TORO ROSSO (ITA)

Ferrari

10

373*

Yet to Score

LOTUS (MAL), HRT (ESP), VIRGIN (ENG)

Cosworth (All)

0

383*

*Can’t win title.

There are 172 points still available