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Monthly Archives: June 2011

RED BULL’S Sebastian Vettel secured his 22nd career pole position and seventh of the season with a Q3 time of 1:36.975 (124.993-mph) around the Valencia Street Circuit ahead of tomorrow’s European Grand Prix.

The reigning world champion will have his team-mate, Mark Webber, for company on the front row of the grid after the Australian set a 1:37.163 in the final part of qualifying. The 2008 world champion, Lewis Hamilton (McLaren), will start from third on the grid, after setting a 1:37.380 lap time.

Fourth to tenth on the grid is as follows: 4th) home favourite Fernando Alonso (Ferrari), 5th) his team-mate Felipe Massa, 6th) Jenson Button (McLaren), 7th) Nico Rosberg (Mercedes), 8th) Michael Schumacher (Mercedes), 9th) Nick Heidfeld (Renault) who didn’t set a Q3 time, as did 10th) Adrian Sutil (Force India). Heidfeld was the quickest of the pair in Q2 and thus is ahead of Sutil on the grid.

Q2 was Red Flagged for a short while after Pastor Maldonado (Williams) stopped out on track with what seemed like electrical problems and a mobile crane needed to be brought onto the track in order to move the car.

Those drivers who were knocked-out of qualifying in Q2 were: 11th) Vitaly Petrov (Renault), 12th) Paul di Resta (Force India), 13th) Rubens Barrichello (Williams), 14th) Kamui Kobayashi (Sauber), 15th) Maldonado, 16th) the well again Sergio Pérez (Sauber) and 17th) Sébastien Buemi (Toro Rosso).

The main (and only) highlight of Q1 was Jarno Trulli spinning his Lotus at Turn 25 on his final lap. The session also claimed Jaime Alguersuari (Toro Rosso) as a victim for the third straight race. His race seat may now come under serious scrutiny if he cannot perform tomorrow in his second home Grand Prix of the season.

Alguersuari will start alongside his team-mate Buemi in 18th place on the grid and ahead of: 19th) Heikki Kovalainen (Lotus), 20th) Trulli, 21st) Timo Glock (Virgin), 22nd) Vitantonio Liuzzi (HRT), 23rd) Jérôme d’Ambrosio (Virgin) and finally 24th) Narain Karthikeyan (HRT) who was nearly a whole second faster than the 107% Rule time of 1:45.301.

Past winners of the European Grand Prix on the grid:

  • Michael Schumacher, 6: 1994 and 1995 (Benetton), 2000, 2001, 2004 and 2006 (Ferrari). All except ’94 at the Nürburgring (Germany). 1994 Euro GP was held at Jerez (Spain).
  • Fernando Alonso, 2: 2005 (Renault) and 2007 (McLaren). Both at the Nürburgring.
  • Rubens Barrichello, 2: 2002 (Ferrari) and 2009 (Brawn). ’02 at the Nürburgring and ’09 in Valencia.
  • Felipe Massa, 1: 2008 (Ferrari). Massa won the first race on the Valencia Street Circuit.
  • Sebastian Vettel, 1: 2010 (Red Bull).

I’m not going to say who I think will win tomorrow, because at the moment anybody who bets against a certain German must have a hotwire to God.

THE 2011 Canadian Grand Prix around the Gilles Villeneuve Circuit will go down in history for producing perhaps the most dramatic last few laps Formula 1 has seen since Brazil 2008.

It started raining in Montreal just before the race was due to get underway. There was a possibility that the race would start under the normal procedure, but race control decided to start the race behind the Safety Car. This first SC period lasted for the first four laps of the Grand Prix. I think that if the race starts under the SC it should just be for the first lap of the race, but then again the Gilles Villeneuve Circuit has very little run-off areas and this was probably the best call.

One of the few occasions Vettel has had a car in front of him this year.

Anyway, the SC came in at the end of lap four and the: reigning world champion, current championship leader, pole sitter and newest inductee into the Wall of Champions wall of shame, Sebastian Vettel (Red Bull) came under immediate pressure from the second placed Ferrari of double world champion Fernando Alonso at Turn 1but held him off. Further back, Lewis Hamilton (McLaren) challenged the other Red Bull of Mark Webber at the same corner for fourth place. Unfortunately the pair touched and Webber was sent into a spin. Hamilton lost ground to the Mercedes pair of Nico Rosberg and Michael Schumacher as well as his McLaren team-mate Jenson Button, whereas Webber found himself much further down the order when he got himself going again.

Button (#4) cashes in on Webber (pointing the wrong way) and Hamilton (behind Webber) nudging each other.

On the next lap Button ran wide at Turn 6and allowed Schumacher to pass him. He now had his team-mate Hamilton to deal with.

Hamilton quickly dispatched his team-mate and began trying to pass Schumacher. On the run down to Turn 10 (L’Epingle ) the seven-times world champion pushed the 2008 world champion wide and onto the run-off area, thus allowing Button to get back ahead of Hamilton.

By this time Hamilton was getting angry inside his helmet. His aggressive driving style (of which I am a great fan) had gotten him into trouble at the previous round in Monaco and was about to go too far once again. Only this time it was with the worst possible person on the track.

At the end of the seventh lap of the Grand Prix race control announced that the Hamilton-Webber incident was under investigation. At the exact same time both McLarens were exiting the Last Chicane and Hamilton had a much higher exit speed than his team-mate in front of him. He pulled out to Button’s left and tried to overtake him around the outside on the start-finish straight. But Button couldn’t see his team-mate due to the amount of spray in his mirrors and stuck to the racing line which was near the pit-wall…this is exactly where Hamilton had placed his car. Two into one didn’t go and the silver machines hit each other sending Hamilton into the pit-wall, puncturing his left-rear tyre and breaking his rear-suspension.

NOOOO!!! 😦

Button’s car was largely undamaged and he carried on at full racing speed though he was clearly unimpressed with his team-mates actions, asking the team over the radio: “What is he doing?!

Hamilton tried to get his car back to the pits as the SC came out so the marshals could pick up the debris on the start-finish straight. But the McLaren team told Hamilton to park the car as the damage was too great, and the Englishman’s race came to an end at Turn 5, the sight of Olivier Panis’s leg-breaking accident in 1997 when he was driving for Prost.

The pair almost come together again.

Rule #1 of Formula 1 – Don’t hit your team-mate.

Meanwhile Button pitted for intermediate tyres under the SC and also found out that hewas now under investigation.

The SC came in at the end of lap 12 with Vettel leading and the Ferraris of Alonso and Felipe Massa second and third respectively. Rosberg held off Schumacher’s attack on his fourth place at the Last Chicane, a move which Kamui Kobayashi (Sauber) had a great view of in sixth place ahead of Nick Heidfeld and Vitaly Petrov (both Renault) who were in seventh and eighth. Webber had worked his way up to ninth ahead of Force India’s Paul di Resta. Button at this point was 12th.

By the end of the first racing lap Button was ninth but had been given a Drive-Through Penalty for being too fast behind the SC. Each drive must stick to a certain lap time under SC conditions, and Button had exceeded that time. He decided to take this penalty immediately (the track has a relatively short pit-lane) but still dropped well down the order to 18th place.

But by lap 19 Button had worked his way back up into eighth place and was challenging the two Renaults. He passed Petrov at Turn 7 but the rain suddenly became torrential, and Button was on the wrong tyres for that amount of rainfall. Unsurprisingly the McLaren ran wide at Turn 10 and the Russian (who used to race on ice) duly took seventh place back. Elsewhere on track Massa radioed his concerns about the rain.

Sure enough a lap later the SC was deployed again, but this time it was in order to prevent an accident. This is something that the drivers had been asking for and it’s nice to see that on this occasion they have been listened to.

The rain got worse and worse and on lap 23 Vettel (still in the lead behind the SC) radio: “[There is] So much water. [We] Cannot restart the race like this. People behind me won’t see in spray and crash.

The field continued behind the SC until the end of lap 25 when the Red Flag was thrown because of the constant downpour. The cars – as in South Korea last year – lined up on the grid in race order and waited for the rain to ease up.

There then followed a TWO HOUR period in which nothing happened on track. BBC commentators Martin Brundle and David Coulthard kept their worldwide audience entertained by discussing a vast range of important subjects which included: Do Birds have Shoulders? Why there aren’t seats in their com-box, pop-star Rihanna being shown around the McLaren garage by a now smiling Lewis Hamilton, a photographer falling over and getting a cheeky up-skirt shot of said pop-star 😀 (who had somebody else holding her Umbrella), how cool Mercedes’ rain tents looked, racing in Australia in the rain in ’89 and ’91, when Kobayashi will get out of his car and go for a comfort break and the boat race the teams used to have across the St. Laurence Seaway. BBC anchormen Jake Humphrey and Eddie Jordan interviewed Star Wars and Indiana Jones director George Lucas and proposed the idea of an F1 film. I on the other hand had to make do with eating cheese and worrying about my A-Level Philosophy & Ethics exam which was the next morning.

Vettel’s thoughts: “Can we just finish this race on the PS3?”

Then, mercifully the rain eased and the race restarted under the SC. The order was: Vettel, Kobayashi, Massa, Heidfeld, Petrov, di Resta, Webber, Alonso, Button and Sauber’s stand-in driver Pedro de la Rosa, whose participation meant that for the first time in 40 years there were two drivers in the race who were over 40 years old (himself and Schumacher, 42).

It wasn’t until the end of lap 34 that the SC returned to the pits because Heikki Kovalainen was limping into retirement with a driveshaft failure on his Lotus. Vettel bolted early so as he wouldn’t have to deal with the often Kamikaze Kobayashi, who actually had his mirrors full of Massa at Turn 1.

Several drivers (Button, Heidfeld, di Resta, Toro Rosso’s Jamie Alguersuari and Williams’ Pastor Maldonado to name a few) all came into the pits for inters at the end of the first racing lap. Button rejoined the race in 15th place.

The 2009 world champion was involved in his second crash of the race on lap 37 when he attempted to pass Alonso’s Ferrari up the inside at Turn 3 and (to me) had won the apex of the corner. But Alonso turned in on him and the pair touched. Alonso was sent spinning and beached his car on the curb as well as damaging the back of his Ferrari, forcing his retirement. Button’s McLaren suffered a front-left puncture and limped back to the pits. The SC came out yet again and the seemingly unstoppable Vettel pitted for new tyres.

Racing was underway again at the end of lap 40 with Vettel still leading from Kobayashi and Massa. Button was now dead last, but was about to revive a McLaren tradition that began with John Watson almost 30 years ago. Attack from the Back.

But before McLaren fans could feel nostalgic again, millions of fans were treated to another blast from the past.

Michael Schumacher took sixth place away from Mark Webber at Turn 10 on lap 42 and was soon promoted to fourth after Paul di Resta broke his front wing on the back of Heidfeld’s Renault, causing them both to pit. By lap 51 Schumacher had caught the Kobayashi-Massa fight for second place. The pair of them got into trouble on the exit of Turn 8 and Schumacher drove straight past the two of them. Michael Schumacher was now second! Massa did pass Kobayashi at Turn 10 but was still third.

He wasn’t third for long however as he aquaplaned into a wall whilst trying to lap Narain Karthikeyan (HRT) just two laps later and the Brazilian damaged the nose of his Ferrari. Further up the track Vettel was pitting for super-soft tyres and his Red Bull team-mate Webber was on a charge.

There was yet more on-track drama on lap 56 when Nick Heidfeld broke his Renault’s front wing on the back of Kobayashi’s Sauber at Turn 2 (Virage Senna). The German carried on at full speed until he ran over his own front wing which sent him slightly airborne. He slid down the escape road at Turn 3 out the way, but the debris on the track was on the racing line and the SC was needed for a record shattering sixth time in the race (I believe Canada ’07 or ‘08 did hold the record with four).

One marshal had a moment to forget when he fell over like Bambi on ice more than once in front of oncoming cars. I reckon he did something then that he hasn’t done since he was a small boy.

But in all seriousness, we were now set for the grandstand finish we were robbed of in Monaco. Vettel had: Schumacher, Webber and Button (who had raced up through the field yet again) right behind him with just 10 laps to go.

When the SC came in Vettel gunned it in a desperate bid to get away from the chasing trio. Webber couldn’t pass Schumacher until the DRS was made available at the end of lap 63. He got ahead of the oldest driver in the race at the Last Chicane but missed the corner itself and went across the run-off area. He had to give Schumacher the place back but also needed to prevent Button from cashing in on him slowing up. Webber judged his move perfectly at Turn 2 and we were back to how we were.

On the end of the 64th lap Webber again cut the Last Chicane trying to DRS his way past Schumacher. Webber almost took out Button as he came back onto the track but couldn’t stop the McLaren moving up to third place.

Button DRSed his way past Schumacher before they got to the Last Chicane one lap later, and could clearly see Vettel ahead of him. Button was driving like a man possessed, but there was still a very real possibility that Vettel would win his sixth race out of seven this season.

With just three laps to go Button was 1.3-seconds behind Vettel and gaining on him, but at the moment wasn’t close enough to get his DRS to work. Webber was close enough to Schumacher however to get his to work and finally passed the Mercedes the Last Chicane.

Button set the fastest lap of the race on lap 69 (the last lap but one) with a 1:16.956 (126.774-mph) lap, but he still couldn’t get past Vettel, who just needed to hang on for another 2.71-miles (4.361-Km).

Then came the moment that has hopefully saved the 2011 season. Vettel ran wide at Turn 6 and slid on the damp surface allowing Button to take the lead with only seven corners to go! Remember what Red Bull said in Malaysia? “We pushed them and they cracked.” How ironic that seems now! 😀

My Dad and I cheered like crazy (perhaps louder than when Liverpool score an injury-time winner) as Button somehow won the 10th and unquestionably the greatest Grand Prix of his career having: started from 7th, had a crash with his team-mate and Alonso, been 21st and last, been in the pits six times and had a D-T Penalty!

Could this be one of the greatest wins F1 has ever seen?

This race was the longest in Formula 1 history at 4h:04m:39.537, breaking the record which had stood since the 1954 German Grand Prix which was won by the legendary Juan Manuel Fangio (then Mercedes), who would have turned 100-years-old yesterday (24 June). Button’s average speed over the course of the whole Grand Prix was only 46.522-mph, making this by far the slowest Grand Prix ever as well.

The race stared at 18:00 my time and did not end until just gone 22:00!

I have never seen Jenson Button drive like he did in Canada before and can’t wait to see if he can carry on this form into the next few races. It has also been proven that Vettel can crack under pressure.

2011 Canadian Grand Prix Top 10.

  1. Jenson Button (McLaren-Mercedes) 70 laps in 4h:04:39.537 – 25 points
  2. Sebastian Vettel (Red Bull-Renault) + 2.709-seconds – 18 points
  3. Mark Webber (Red Bull-Renault) +13.828-seconds – 15 points
  4. Michael Schumacher (Mercedes) + 14.219-seconds – 12 points
  5. Vitaly Petrov (Renault) +20.395-seconds – 10 points
  6. Felipe Massa (Ferrari) +33.225-seconds – 8 points, who passed…
  7. Kamui Kobayashi (Sauber-Ferrari) +33.270-seconds – 6 points, on the line!
  8. Jaime Alguersuari (Toro Rosso-Ferrari) +35.964-seconds – 4 points, his best F1 finish (also started from the pit-lane).
  9. Rubens Barrichello (Williams-Cosworth) +45.117-seconds – 2 points
  10. Sébastien Buemi (Toro Rosso-Ferrari) +47.056-seconds – 1 point.

Rosberg came 11th, de la Rosa showed that he still has it by finishing 12th and Vitantonio Liuzzi came home in 13th, HRT’s best ever finish.

I have been watching F1 religiously since 1996, and I can confidently say that this was one of the very best races I’ve ever seen.

PS: The moral of the story is, all you need to do is lead the last lap.

DRIVERS’ CHAMPIONSHIP – After 7/19 Races.

Pos

Driver

Constructor

Points

Gap From 1st

1

Sebastian VETTEL (GER)

Red Bull

161

2

Jenson BUTTON (ENG)

McLaren

101

60

3

Mark WEBBER (AUS)

Red Bull

94

67

4

Lewis HAMILTON (ENG)

McLaren

85

76

5

Fernando ALONSO (ESP)

Ferrari

69

92

6

Felipe MASSA (BRA)

Ferrari

32

129

7

Vitaly PETROV (RUS)

Renault

31

130

8

Nick HEIDFELD (GER)

Renault

29

132

9

Michael SCHUMACHER (GER)

Mercedes

26

135

10

Nico ROSBERG (GER)

Mercedes

26

135

11

Kamui KOBAYASHI (JAP)

Sauber

25

136

12

Adrian SUTIL (GER)

Force India

8

153

13

Sébastien BUEMI (SWI)

Toro Rosso

8

153

14

Jamie ALGUERSUARI (ESP)

Toro Rosso

4

157

15

Rubens BARRICHELLO (BRA)

Williams

4

157

16

Sergio PÉREZ (MEX)

Sauber

2

159

17

Paul DI RESTA (SCO)

Force India

2

159

CONSTRUCTORS’ CHAMPIONSHIP – After 7/19 Races.

Pos

Constructor

Engine

Points

Gap From 1st

1

RED BULL (AUT)

Renault

255

2

MCLAREN (ENG)

Mercedes

186

69

3

FERRARI (ITA)

Ferrari

101

154

4

RENAULT (ENG)

Renault

60

195

5

MERCEDES (GER)

Mercedes

52

203

6

SAUBER (SWI)

Ferrari

27

228

7

TORO ROSSO (ITA)

Ferrari

12

243

8

FORCE INDIA (IND)

Mercedes

10

245

9

WILLIAMS (ENG)

Cosworth

4

251

SEBASTIAN VETTEL (Red Bull) will start on pole-position for the sixth race out of seven this season after setting the fastest time in Q3 for today’s Canadian Grand Prix at the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal.

The German’s Q3 time was 1:13.014 (133.618-mph), 0.185-seconds ahead of Ferrari’s Fernando Alonso who will line up second on the grid. His Ferrari team-mate Felipe Massa will start from third.

Fourth to tenth place on the grid are: 4th) Mark Webber (Red Bull), 5th) Lewis Hamilton (McLaren) – the first time he has not been on pole in Canada, 6th) Nico Rosberg (Mercedes), 7th) Jenson Button (McLaren), 8th) Michael Schumacher (Mercedes), 9th) Nick Heidfeld and 10th) Vitaly Petrov (both Renault).

Q2 saw the grid places 11-17 filled by: 11th) Paul di Resta (Force India), 12th) Pastor Maldonado (Williams), 13th) Kamui Kobayashi (Sauber), 14th) Adrian Sutil (Force India), 15th) Sébastien Buemi (Toro Rosso), 16th) Rubens Barrichello (Williams) and 17th) Pedro de la Rosa (Sauber).

Pedro de la Rosa is driving Sergio Pérez’s car in the race today after the Mexican complained of feeling ill during Friday’s first practice session. He was given the all clear to race by the FIA doctors after his accident in Monaco last time out, but he didn’t want to risk hurting himself again or anybody else. The reason why de la Rosa is driving for the team who fired him last season is because Sauber’s regular reserve driver, Mexican Esteban Gutiérrez, is not in Montreal.

How daft is this?! Unless Gutiérrez is not in Canada for a really good reason Sauber have shown themselves up in a huge way here. There was a chance that Pérez may not have felt well enough to race and they haven’t brought their third driver to the race! Apparently de la Rosa (now a McLaren test and reserve driver) was given just 10 minutes warning that he would be driving a Sauber in Friday practice two and had to do it in his McLaren overalls.

But to his credit he did get himself into Q2, but the following drivers didn’t and will line up thus: 18th) the under pressure Jamie Alguersuari (Toro Rosso), 19th) Jarno Trulli and 20th) Heikki Kovalainen (both Lotus – Trulli out-qualifies his team-mate for the first time this season), 21st) Vitantonio Liuzzi (HRT), 22nd) Timo Glock (Virgin) and 23rd) Narain Karthikeyan (HRT).

The 107% Rule claimed Virgin’s Jérôme d’Ambrosio in Q1. The Belgian rookie could only manage a 1:19.414 (122.850-mph) lap when he needed to set a time of at least 1:18.989 (123.511-mph). However he will start the race from 24th on the grid after the stewards declared that he had set a fast enough time during Friday practice one before he stuffed his car in the wall at Turn Four and had to change chassis.

Montreal has been deep McLaren territory for the past few seasons, but I can only see one winner today, and he is the man sitting on pole, Sebastian Vettel.

Past winners of the Canadian Grand Prix on the grid today:

  • Michael Schumacher: 1994 for Benetton, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2003 and 2004 for Ferrari.
  • Lewis Hamilton: 2007 (his first win) and 2010 for McLaren.
  • Fernando Alonso: 2006 for Renault.

RED BULL’S defending world champion, Sebastian Vettel, held off a strong challenge from Ferrari’s Fernando Alonso and McLaren’s Jenson Button in order to win this season’s Monaco Grand Prix.

Fernando Alonso (left), Sebastian Vettel (centre) and Jenson Button (right) on the traditional Monaco podium along with HSH Prince Albert II of Monaco (behind Vettel).

The 23-year-old won his 15th Grand Prix (and first around the famous Circuit de Monaco) in a time of 2:09:38.373, at an average speed of 75.088-mph. There featured a Safety Car stoppage after Felipe Massa’s crash in the Tunnel on lap 33, and a full blown Red Flag scenario when: Adrian Sutil (Force India), Jamie Alguersuari (Toro Rosso), Lewis Hamilton (McLaren) and Vitaly Petrov (Renault) were all involved in a crash at Swimming Pool right in front of the three leaders. Alguersuari was out of the race, as was Petrov who had to be removed from his car and taken to hospital for checks.

Petrov being attended immediately after the crash.

This was the second time in the meeting that a driver had to be taken to hospital, the first being Sauber’s Sergio Pérez after his frightening crash in Q3 the day before.

The second Red Bull of Mark Webber set the fastest lap of the race on the 78th and last lap with a time of 1:16.234 (98.224-mph).

Hamilton and Michael Schumacher (Mercedes) put on a spectacular show at the start of the race. Schumacher fluffed the start and this caused Hamilton (who started ninth) to pass Schumacher who had started fifth. But the seven-times world champion passed the 2008 world champion at the Grand-Hotel Hairpin. Hamilton tried his upmost to get by Schumacher, and succeeded on lap 10 at the notoriously difficult to pass at first corner, Sainte Devote. I can’t remember the last time I saw somebody go up the inside at that corner and make it work, and the fact that it was Hamilton on Schumacher made me cheer as if England had just scored a Golden Goal.

It is a crying shame that this brilliant move was overshadowed by Hamilton’s actions later on in the race as well as after it.

Hamilton and Massa had a bit of arge-barge at the Grand-Hotel Hairpin and on the same lap Massa’s race ended in the Armco of the Tunnel.

This was the first time that Massa has failed to finish the Monaco Grand Prix since his first in F1 back in 2002.

For causing this avoidable accident Hamilton was given a Drive-Through Penalty. Then on the 73rd lap (the first lap of the restarted race) Hamilton sent Williams rookie Pastor Maldonado into the tyre barrier at Sainte-Devote, costing him what would have been his first points in F1.

Hamilton eventually finished sixth, and was subsequently given a 20-second time penalty for his conduct during the race. The Englishman was furious at this and told the worlds press after the race: “ Out of six races [this season] I’ve been to the stewards five times. It’s a joke, it’s an absolute frickin’ joke.” When asked why he thought this might be he shamed himself. “I don’t know.” He said. “What was it Ali G used to say? ‘Is it ‘cos I is black?’”

I never ever though that Lewis Hamilton would ever play that card. But he has since fully apologised, and FIA President Jean Todt has said that the matter is now over. However if Hamilton had been called in front of the FIA about this outburst it is likely that he would have been banned for as many as six races. This would have meant missing: Canada, Europe (Valencia), his home race – the British Grand Prix, Germany, Hungary and Belgium, returning for the Italian Grand Prix at Monza on 11 September. This would effectively hand the title to Sebastian Vettel.

By the way, is anybody going to stop him? We’ll have to find out in Montreal this weekend.

Points paying positions for 2011 Monaco Grand Prix:

  1. Sebastian Vettel (Red Bull) = 25
  2. Fernando Alonso (Ferrari) = 18
  3. Jenson Button (McLaren) = 15
  4. Mark Webber (Red Bull) = 12
  5. Kamui Kobayashi (Sauber) = 10 – his best finish in F1
  6. Lewis Hamilton (McLaren) = 8 – 20-second time penalty
  7. Adrian Sutil (Force India) = 6
  8. Nick Heidfeld (Renault) = 4
  9. Rubens Barrichello (Williams) = 2 – Williams’ first points finish of 2011
  10. Sébastien Buemi (Toro Rosso) = 1

 

I know I said I’d do a full race blog for Monaco but I wanted to experiment with how I write them. Having done this I think I’ll go back to how I originally did them.

The Indy 500 blog will now (hopefully) be combined with the Le Mans 24-Hour blog.

DRIVERS’ CHAMPIONSHIP – After 6/19 Races.

Pos

Driver

Constructor

Points

Gap From 1st

1

Sebastian VETTEL (GER)

Red Bull

143

2

Lewis HAMILTON (ENG)

McLaren

85

58

3

Mark WEBBER (AUS)

Red Bull

79

64

4

Jenson BUTTON (ENG)

McLaren

76

67

5

Fernando ALONSO (ESP)

Ferrari

69

74

6

Nick HEIDFELD (GER)

Renault

29

114

7

Nico ROSBERG (GER)

Mercedes

26

117

8

Felipe MASSA (BRA)

Ferrari

24

119

9

Vitaly PETROV (RUS)

Renault

21

122

10

Kamui KOBAYASHI (JAP)

Sauber

19

124

11

Michael SCHUMACHER (GER)

Mercedes

14

129

12

Adrian SUTIL (GER)

Force India

8

135

13

Sébastien BUEMI (SWI)

Toro Rosso

7

136

14

Rubens BARRICHELLO (BRA)

Williams

2

141

15

Sergio PÉREZ (MEX)

Sauber

2

141

16

Paul DI RESTA (SCO)

Force India

2

141

 
 

CONSTRUCTORS’ CHAMPIONSHIP – After 6/19 Races.

Pos

Constructor

Engine

Points

Gap From 1st

1

RED BULL (AUT)

Renault

222

2

MCLAREN (ENG)

Mercedes

161

61

3

FERRARI (ITA)

Ferrari

93

129

4

RENAULT (ENG)

Renault

50

172

5

MERCEDES (GER)

Mercedes

40

182

6

SAUBER (SWI)

Ferrari

21

201

7

FORCE INDIA (IND)

Mercedes

10

212

8

TORO ROSSO (ITA)

Ferrari

7

215

9

WILLIAMS (ENG)

Cosworth

2

220

If you are a man and noticed the car before the girl, then I have some bad news for you.