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2009 WORLD champion Jenson Button (McLaren) won this season’s Hungarian Grand Prix at the Hungaroring, the same track where he took hismaiden victory back in 2006 for Honda. This win was made even more special becausethis was Button’s 200th Grand Prix.

Button's second win in Hungary.

Mind out Jenson, you might break it.

Button once again proved he is the best driver on the grid in changeable conditions, but if his McLaren team-mate, Lewis Hamilton, was on the right tyres Button may not have had it all his own way. Hamilton ended up finishing back in fourth behind current championship leader Sebastian Vettel (Red Bull) and Ferrari’s Fernando Alonso who came second and third respectively.

Red Bull’s Mark Webber came fifth just over a second behind Hamilton, while Ferrari’s Felipe Massa was sixth and the last driver to complete the full 70 lap race distances.

The most dramatic moment of the race was when Nick Heidfeld’s Renault caught fire just before Turn 1 on lap 24 and then exploded, almost wiping out the marshal who was attempting to put the blaze out.

As far as I know he is okay.

Massa set the fastest lap of the race on lap 61 with a 1:23.415 (117.389-mph) tour.

Top 10 finishers of the XXVII Hungarian Grand Prix:

  1. Jenson Button (McLaren-Mercedes), 70 laps, 1h:46m:42.337s @ 107.145-mph. 25 points.
  2. Sebastian Vettel (Red Bull-Renault), +3.588s. 18 points.
  3. Fernando Alonso (Ferrari), +19.819s. 15 points.
  4. Lewis Hamilton (McLaren-Mercedes), +48.338s. 12 points.
  5. Mark Webber (Red Bull-Renault), +49.742s. 10 points.
  6. Felipe Massa (Ferrari), +1m:23.176. 8 points.
  7. Paul di Resta (Force India-Mercedes), + 1 lap. 6 points, his best finish in F1.
  8. Sébastien Buemi (Toro Rosso-Ferrari), + 1 lap. 4 points, not bad from 23rd on the grid, plus this was Toro Rosso’s 100th Grand Prix.
  9. Nico Rosberg (Mercedes), + 1 lap. 2 points, this was also Rosberg’s 100th Grand Prix.
  10. Jaime Alguersuari, (Toro Rosso-Ferrari), + 1 lap. 1 point.

 

I’m sorry for the lateness and shortness of this report, but my University placing hasn’t gone exactly to plan.

DRIVERS’ CHAMPIONSHIP – After 11/19 Races.

Pos

Driver

Constructor

Points

Gap From 1st

1

Sebastian VETTEL (GER)

Red Bull

234

2

Mark WEBBER (AUS)

Red Bull

149

85

3

Lewis HAMILTON (ENG)

McLaren

146

88

4

Fernando ALONSO (ESP)

Ferrari

145

89

5

Jenson BUTTON (ENG)

McLaren

134

100

6

Felipe MASSA (BRA)

Ferrari

70

164

7

Nico ROSBERG (GER)

Mercedes

48

186

8

Nick HEIDFELD (GER)

Renault

34

200

9

Vitaly PETROV (RUS)

Renault

32

202

10

Michael SCHUMACHER (GER)

Mercedes

32

202

11

Kamui KOBAYASHI (JAP)

Sauber

27

207

12

Adrian SUTIL (GER)

Force India

18

216

13

Sébastien BUEMI (SWI)

Toro Rosso

12

222

14

Jamie ALGUERSUARI (ESP)

Toro Rosso

10

224

15

Sergio PÉREZ (MEX)

Sauber

8

226

16

Paul DI RESTA (SCO)

Force India

8

226

17

Rubens BARRICHELLO (BRA)

Williams

4

230

 

CONSTRUCTORS’ CHAMPIONSHIP – After 11/19 Races.

Pos

Constructor

Engine

Points

Gap From 1st

1

RED BULL (AUT)

Renault

383

2

MCLAREN (ENG)

Mercedes

280

103

3

FERRARI (ITA)

Ferrari

215

168

4

MERCEDES (GER)

Mercedes

80

303

5

RENAULT (ENG)

Renault

66

317

6

SAUBER (SWI)

Ferrari

35

348

7

FORCE INDIA (IND)

Mercedes

26

357

8

TORO ROSSO (ITA)

Ferrari

22

361

9

WILLIAMS  (ENG)

Cosworth

4

379

THE 2011 Canadian Grand Prix around the Gilles Villeneuve Circuit will go down in history for producing perhaps the most dramatic last few laps Formula 1 has seen since Brazil 2008.

It started raining in Montreal just before the race was due to get underway. There was a possibility that the race would start under the normal procedure, but race control decided to start the race behind the Safety Car. This first SC period lasted for the first four laps of the Grand Prix. I think that if the race starts under the SC it should just be for the first lap of the race, but then again the Gilles Villeneuve Circuit has very little run-off areas and this was probably the best call.

One of the few occasions Vettel has had a car in front of him this year.

Anyway, the SC came in at the end of lap four and the: reigning world champion, current championship leader, pole sitter and newest inductee into the Wall of Champions wall of shame, Sebastian Vettel (Red Bull) came under immediate pressure from the second placed Ferrari of double world champion Fernando Alonso at Turn 1but held him off. Further back, Lewis Hamilton (McLaren) challenged the other Red Bull of Mark Webber at the same corner for fourth place. Unfortunately the pair touched and Webber was sent into a spin. Hamilton lost ground to the Mercedes pair of Nico Rosberg and Michael Schumacher as well as his McLaren team-mate Jenson Button, whereas Webber found himself much further down the order when he got himself going again.

Button (#4) cashes in on Webber (pointing the wrong way) and Hamilton (behind Webber) nudging each other.

On the next lap Button ran wide at Turn 6and allowed Schumacher to pass him. He now had his team-mate Hamilton to deal with.

Hamilton quickly dispatched his team-mate and began trying to pass Schumacher. On the run down to Turn 10 (L’Epingle ) the seven-times world champion pushed the 2008 world champion wide and onto the run-off area, thus allowing Button to get back ahead of Hamilton.

By this time Hamilton was getting angry inside his helmet. His aggressive driving style (of which I am a great fan) had gotten him into trouble at the previous round in Monaco and was about to go too far once again. Only this time it was with the worst possible person on the track.

At the end of the seventh lap of the Grand Prix race control announced that the Hamilton-Webber incident was under investigation. At the exact same time both McLarens were exiting the Last Chicane and Hamilton had a much higher exit speed than his team-mate in front of him. He pulled out to Button’s left and tried to overtake him around the outside on the start-finish straight. But Button couldn’t see his team-mate due to the amount of spray in his mirrors and stuck to the racing line which was near the pit-wall…this is exactly where Hamilton had placed his car. Two into one didn’t go and the silver machines hit each other sending Hamilton into the pit-wall, puncturing his left-rear tyre and breaking his rear-suspension.

NOOOO!!! 😦

Button’s car was largely undamaged and he carried on at full racing speed though he was clearly unimpressed with his team-mates actions, asking the team over the radio: “What is he doing?!

Hamilton tried to get his car back to the pits as the SC came out so the marshals could pick up the debris on the start-finish straight. But the McLaren team told Hamilton to park the car as the damage was too great, and the Englishman’s race came to an end at Turn 5, the sight of Olivier Panis’s leg-breaking accident in 1997 when he was driving for Prost.

The pair almost come together again.

Rule #1 of Formula 1 – Don’t hit your team-mate.

Meanwhile Button pitted for intermediate tyres under the SC and also found out that hewas now under investigation.

The SC came in at the end of lap 12 with Vettel leading and the Ferraris of Alonso and Felipe Massa second and third respectively. Rosberg held off Schumacher’s attack on his fourth place at the Last Chicane, a move which Kamui Kobayashi (Sauber) had a great view of in sixth place ahead of Nick Heidfeld and Vitaly Petrov (both Renault) who were in seventh and eighth. Webber had worked his way up to ninth ahead of Force India’s Paul di Resta. Button at this point was 12th.

By the end of the first racing lap Button was ninth but had been given a Drive-Through Penalty for being too fast behind the SC. Each drive must stick to a certain lap time under SC conditions, and Button had exceeded that time. He decided to take this penalty immediately (the track has a relatively short pit-lane) but still dropped well down the order to 18th place.

But by lap 19 Button had worked his way back up into eighth place and was challenging the two Renaults. He passed Petrov at Turn 7 but the rain suddenly became torrential, and Button was on the wrong tyres for that amount of rainfall. Unsurprisingly the McLaren ran wide at Turn 10 and the Russian (who used to race on ice) duly took seventh place back. Elsewhere on track Massa radioed his concerns about the rain.

Sure enough a lap later the SC was deployed again, but this time it was in order to prevent an accident. This is something that the drivers had been asking for and it’s nice to see that on this occasion they have been listened to.

The rain got worse and worse and on lap 23 Vettel (still in the lead behind the SC) radio: “[There is] So much water. [We] Cannot restart the race like this. People behind me won’t see in spray and crash.

The field continued behind the SC until the end of lap 25 when the Red Flag was thrown because of the constant downpour. The cars – as in South Korea last year – lined up on the grid in race order and waited for the rain to ease up.

There then followed a TWO HOUR period in which nothing happened on track. BBC commentators Martin Brundle and David Coulthard kept their worldwide audience entertained by discussing a vast range of important subjects which included: Do Birds have Shoulders? Why there aren’t seats in their com-box, pop-star Rihanna being shown around the McLaren garage by a now smiling Lewis Hamilton, a photographer falling over and getting a cheeky up-skirt shot of said pop-star 😀 (who had somebody else holding her Umbrella), how cool Mercedes’ rain tents looked, racing in Australia in the rain in ’89 and ’91, when Kobayashi will get out of his car and go for a comfort break and the boat race the teams used to have across the St. Laurence Seaway. BBC anchormen Jake Humphrey and Eddie Jordan interviewed Star Wars and Indiana Jones director George Lucas and proposed the idea of an F1 film. I on the other hand had to make do with eating cheese and worrying about my A-Level Philosophy & Ethics exam which was the next morning.

Vettel’s thoughts: “Can we just finish this race on the PS3?”

Then, mercifully the rain eased and the race restarted under the SC. The order was: Vettel, Kobayashi, Massa, Heidfeld, Petrov, di Resta, Webber, Alonso, Button and Sauber’s stand-in driver Pedro de la Rosa, whose participation meant that for the first time in 40 years there were two drivers in the race who were over 40 years old (himself and Schumacher, 42).

It wasn’t until the end of lap 34 that the SC returned to the pits because Heikki Kovalainen was limping into retirement with a driveshaft failure on his Lotus. Vettel bolted early so as he wouldn’t have to deal with the often Kamikaze Kobayashi, who actually had his mirrors full of Massa at Turn 1.

Several drivers (Button, Heidfeld, di Resta, Toro Rosso’s Jamie Alguersuari and Williams’ Pastor Maldonado to name a few) all came into the pits for inters at the end of the first racing lap. Button rejoined the race in 15th place.

The 2009 world champion was involved in his second crash of the race on lap 37 when he attempted to pass Alonso’s Ferrari up the inside at Turn 3 and (to me) had won the apex of the corner. But Alonso turned in on him and the pair touched. Alonso was sent spinning and beached his car on the curb as well as damaging the back of his Ferrari, forcing his retirement. Button’s McLaren suffered a front-left puncture and limped back to the pits. The SC came out yet again and the seemingly unstoppable Vettel pitted for new tyres.

Racing was underway again at the end of lap 40 with Vettel still leading from Kobayashi and Massa. Button was now dead last, but was about to revive a McLaren tradition that began with John Watson almost 30 years ago. Attack from the Back.

But before McLaren fans could feel nostalgic again, millions of fans were treated to another blast from the past.

Michael Schumacher took sixth place away from Mark Webber at Turn 10 on lap 42 and was soon promoted to fourth after Paul di Resta broke his front wing on the back of Heidfeld’s Renault, causing them both to pit. By lap 51 Schumacher had caught the Kobayashi-Massa fight for second place. The pair of them got into trouble on the exit of Turn 8 and Schumacher drove straight past the two of them. Michael Schumacher was now second! Massa did pass Kobayashi at Turn 10 but was still third.

He wasn’t third for long however as he aquaplaned into a wall whilst trying to lap Narain Karthikeyan (HRT) just two laps later and the Brazilian damaged the nose of his Ferrari. Further up the track Vettel was pitting for super-soft tyres and his Red Bull team-mate Webber was on a charge.

There was yet more on-track drama on lap 56 when Nick Heidfeld broke his Renault’s front wing on the back of Kobayashi’s Sauber at Turn 2 (Virage Senna). The German carried on at full speed until he ran over his own front wing which sent him slightly airborne. He slid down the escape road at Turn 3 out the way, but the debris on the track was on the racing line and the SC was needed for a record shattering sixth time in the race (I believe Canada ’07 or ‘08 did hold the record with four).

One marshal had a moment to forget when he fell over like Bambi on ice more than once in front of oncoming cars. I reckon he did something then that he hasn’t done since he was a small boy.

But in all seriousness, we were now set for the grandstand finish we were robbed of in Monaco. Vettel had: Schumacher, Webber and Button (who had raced up through the field yet again) right behind him with just 10 laps to go.

When the SC came in Vettel gunned it in a desperate bid to get away from the chasing trio. Webber couldn’t pass Schumacher until the DRS was made available at the end of lap 63. He got ahead of the oldest driver in the race at the Last Chicane but missed the corner itself and went across the run-off area. He had to give Schumacher the place back but also needed to prevent Button from cashing in on him slowing up. Webber judged his move perfectly at Turn 2 and we were back to how we were.

On the end of the 64th lap Webber again cut the Last Chicane trying to DRS his way past Schumacher. Webber almost took out Button as he came back onto the track but couldn’t stop the McLaren moving up to third place.

Button DRSed his way past Schumacher before they got to the Last Chicane one lap later, and could clearly see Vettel ahead of him. Button was driving like a man possessed, but there was still a very real possibility that Vettel would win his sixth race out of seven this season.

With just three laps to go Button was 1.3-seconds behind Vettel and gaining on him, but at the moment wasn’t close enough to get his DRS to work. Webber was close enough to Schumacher however to get his to work and finally passed the Mercedes the Last Chicane.

Button set the fastest lap of the race on lap 69 (the last lap but one) with a 1:16.956 (126.774-mph) lap, but he still couldn’t get past Vettel, who just needed to hang on for another 2.71-miles (4.361-Km).

Then came the moment that has hopefully saved the 2011 season. Vettel ran wide at Turn 6 and slid on the damp surface allowing Button to take the lead with only seven corners to go! Remember what Red Bull said in Malaysia? “We pushed them and they cracked.” How ironic that seems now! 😀

My Dad and I cheered like crazy (perhaps louder than when Liverpool score an injury-time winner) as Button somehow won the 10th and unquestionably the greatest Grand Prix of his career having: started from 7th, had a crash with his team-mate and Alonso, been 21st and last, been in the pits six times and had a D-T Penalty!

Could this be one of the greatest wins F1 has ever seen?

This race was the longest in Formula 1 history at 4h:04m:39.537, breaking the record which had stood since the 1954 German Grand Prix which was won by the legendary Juan Manuel Fangio (then Mercedes), who would have turned 100-years-old yesterday (24 June). Button’s average speed over the course of the whole Grand Prix was only 46.522-mph, making this by far the slowest Grand Prix ever as well.

The race stared at 18:00 my time and did not end until just gone 22:00!

I have never seen Jenson Button drive like he did in Canada before and can’t wait to see if he can carry on this form into the next few races. It has also been proven that Vettel can crack under pressure.

2011 Canadian Grand Prix Top 10.

  1. Jenson Button (McLaren-Mercedes) 70 laps in 4h:04:39.537 – 25 points
  2. Sebastian Vettel (Red Bull-Renault) + 2.709-seconds – 18 points
  3. Mark Webber (Red Bull-Renault) +13.828-seconds – 15 points
  4. Michael Schumacher (Mercedes) + 14.219-seconds – 12 points
  5. Vitaly Petrov (Renault) +20.395-seconds – 10 points
  6. Felipe Massa (Ferrari) +33.225-seconds – 8 points, who passed…
  7. Kamui Kobayashi (Sauber-Ferrari) +33.270-seconds – 6 points, on the line!
  8. Jaime Alguersuari (Toro Rosso-Ferrari) +35.964-seconds – 4 points, his best F1 finish (also started from the pit-lane).
  9. Rubens Barrichello (Williams-Cosworth) +45.117-seconds – 2 points
  10. Sébastien Buemi (Toro Rosso-Ferrari) +47.056-seconds – 1 point.

Rosberg came 11th, de la Rosa showed that he still has it by finishing 12th and Vitantonio Liuzzi came home in 13th, HRT’s best ever finish.

I have been watching F1 religiously since 1996, and I can confidently say that this was one of the very best races I’ve ever seen.

PS: The moral of the story is, all you need to do is lead the last lap.

DRIVERS’ CHAMPIONSHIP – After 7/19 Races.

Pos

Driver

Constructor

Points

Gap From 1st

1

Sebastian VETTEL (GER)

Red Bull

161

2

Jenson BUTTON (ENG)

McLaren

101

60

3

Mark WEBBER (AUS)

Red Bull

94

67

4

Lewis HAMILTON (ENG)

McLaren

85

76

5

Fernando ALONSO (ESP)

Ferrari

69

92

6

Felipe MASSA (BRA)

Ferrari

32

129

7

Vitaly PETROV (RUS)

Renault

31

130

8

Nick HEIDFELD (GER)

Renault

29

132

9

Michael SCHUMACHER (GER)

Mercedes

26

135

10

Nico ROSBERG (GER)

Mercedes

26

135

11

Kamui KOBAYASHI (JAP)

Sauber

25

136

12

Adrian SUTIL (GER)

Force India

8

153

13

Sébastien BUEMI (SWI)

Toro Rosso

8

153

14

Jamie ALGUERSUARI (ESP)

Toro Rosso

4

157

15

Rubens BARRICHELLO (BRA)

Williams

4

157

16

Sergio PÉREZ (MEX)

Sauber

2

159

17

Paul DI RESTA (SCO)

Force India

2

159

CONSTRUCTORS’ CHAMPIONSHIP – After 7/19 Races.

Pos

Constructor

Engine

Points

Gap From 1st

1

RED BULL (AUT)

Renault

255

2

MCLAREN (ENG)

Mercedes

186

69

3

FERRARI (ITA)

Ferrari

101

154

4

RENAULT (ENG)

Renault

60

195

5

MERCEDES (GER)

Mercedes

52

203

6

SAUBER (SWI)

Ferrari

27

228

7

TORO ROSSO (ITA)

Ferrari

12

243

8

FORCE INDIA (IND)

Mercedes

10

245

9

WILLIAMS (ENG)

Cosworth

4

251

Lewis Hamilton: "What numbers shall we take away Jenson?" Jenson Button: "I'll have a 1 & 25, and I think you'll like 2 & 18."

REIGNING F1 World Champion Jenson Button won his second race of the 2010 season today after a masterful drive in the ever-changing weather conditions in Shanghai. The Brit won the 56 lap event in a time of 1:46:42.163 (106.591 mph). Crossing the line just 1.5 seconds behind him was his team-mate Lewis Hamilton who carved his way through the field to help record McLaren’s first 1-2 finish since the 2007 Italian Grand Prix. Mercedes driver Nico Rosberg again out shone his team-mate Michael Schumacher to finish third. Hamilton set the fastest lap of the race with a lap of 1:42.061 (119.470 mph).

The first lap was eventful for a number of reasons. Timo Glock was left up on his jacks by his mechanics and didn’t start the race at all due to engine failure. Ferrari’s Fernando Alonso jumped the start and led Mark Webber who had taken revenge on fellow Red Bull driver and pole sitter Sebastian Vettel by passing him into the first corner. Behind them, Vitantonio Liuzzi dropped his Force India under braking and crashed into Kobayashi’s Sauber and Buemi’s Toro Rosso.

This accident heralded the arrival of the Safety Car and many of the front runners dived into the pits to change tyres as the first of the on-off rain showers which affected the whole race began to dampen the track. But the intermediate tyres the drivers had changed to only lasted about three laps, meaning everyone had to change their tyres yet again. This led to the main talking point of the race. Hamilton and Vettel entered the pits side by side and Hamilton only just squeezed ahead. The pair were then released at near enough the same time meaning they were again neck and neck, only this time actually in the pit lane. Vettel was now the one doing the squeezing, and Hamilton nearly drove into another team’s equipment as a result. The Stewards announced that they would investigate the incident after the race, and later gave both drivers a reprimand as to their future conduct.

By Lap 16 Hamilton was ahead of both Red Bulls and going wheel to wheel with the Mercedes of Michael Schumacher. The seven times World Champion prevented Hamilton from passing him on this lap, but Hamilton passed Schumacher the next time around with a beautiful double overtake. The guard has well and truly changed.

The next major piece of action came when Jamie Alguersuari broke his Toro Rosso’s front wing leaving debris on the track. The Safety Car was brought out again (when double waved yellows would have done) and the whole field bunched up. Alonso who was then over 70 seconds behind leader Button was now back in contention for the race win.

When the Safety Car finally came in it was time for Jenson Button to make everyone think: “Oh, is that allowed?” He slowed right down and the whole field concertinaed up. Hamilton was actually forced to take to the grass because there was nowhere else to go. At the re-start Vettel bumped into Hamilton, who in turned knocked ‘Canberra Milk’ spokesperson Mark Webber off the track and down the order.

Hamilton continued to scythe through the field, and on lap 29 he passed Robert Kubica’s Renault. At the same point a few seconds later, Alonso passed Adrian Sutil’s Force India.

Hamilton eventually jumped the Mercedes of Nico Rosberg in the pits and the Woking based team were now running first and second. But as the race went on, both Button and Hamilton’s tyres began to fade away, but so were those of chasing pair Rosberg and Alonso. Nails were being bitten and nerves were jangling at an alarming rate! Especially when Button went off.

Russian Renault driver Vital Petrov was reward for a great drive in only his fourth Grand Prix as Mark Webber slid around turn 12, allowing him up to seventh to score his first six points in F1.

In the end Button and Hamilton crossed the finishing line comfortably ahead of Rosberg and Alonso, and I went mad! 😀  I’ve waited so long for a 1-2 finish and was so glad it had finally happened.

Roll on the Spanish Grand Prix on the 9th of May. That is if the paddock can get all their kit back home.

Drivers’ Standings

  1. Button 60pts
  2. Rosberg 50pts
  3. Alonso 49pts
  4. Hamilton 49pts
  5. Vettel 45pts
  6. Massa 41pts
  7. Kubica 40pts
  8. Webber 28pts
  9. Sutil 10pts
  10. Schumacher 10pts

 

Constructor’s Standings

  1. McLaren 109pts
  2. Ferrari 90pts
  3. Red Bull 73pts
  4. Mercedes 60pts
  5. Renault 46pts
  6. Force India 18pts
  7. Williams 6pts
  8. Toro Rosso 2pts

Jenson Button is P1 again!!!!!

REIGNING World Champion Jenson Button drove a near perfect race to win the second round of this year’s championship in Australia. 🙂 He completed the 58 lap race in a time of 1h:33m:36.531 (122.501 mph). Local boy Mark Webber set the fastest lap of the race with a lap time of 1:28.358 (134.249 mph).

The race itself started in wet conditions and proved eventful from the very first corner. Button was left with nowhere to go by the Ferrari of Fernando Alonso and the pair touched. Alonso, the winner of the last race in Bahrain, ended up pointing the wrong way, losing all of the advantages qualifying third had given him. At the same corner, Michael Schumacher’s Mercedes suffered front wing damage and he had to change his nose cone. This in effect ruined his race.

"Hello is that the AA?"

But a little bit down the road – still on lap 1 – came the first racing crash of the season. Kamui Kobayashi’s Sauber lost its front wing, it got stuck underneath his car and sent him into the wall. But this didn’t slow him down and he t-boned the unsuspecting and extremely unfortunate Sébastien Buemi (Toro Rosso) and Nico Hülkenberg (Williams). None of the drivers were hurt.

After the Safety Car came in when all the debris was clear from the above accident, Jenson Button made the call to come into the pits and change onto dry tyres. I thought he was mad, and after he slid off at turn three I believed he had blown the race. But the racing Gods rewarded his brave decision, lifting the rain clouds and sending all the other leaders into the pits to change their tyres. After everyone was back on slicks only Vettel’s Red Bull was ahead of Button.

The next big drama took place on lap 16. Mark Webber passed Felipe Massa’s Ferrari going into turn one to the delight of the home fans. Lewis Hamilton then passed Massa in the very same corner and drag raced Webber down to turn three. But Webber overshot the corner and ran into the gravel trap. This caused Hamilton to almost go off as well and allowed Massa to re-pass the pair of them.

Lap 22 saw Hamilton pass Massa again going into the first corner in a daring slipstreaming move. But as Massa tried to get his old place back from Hamilton, his closely following Ferrari team-mate Alonso was forced off of the dry racing line, letting Mark Webber through.

Four laps later Lewis passed Nico Rosberg’s Mercedes around the outside at turn 11 in what will probably be a contender for pass of the season. As the pair tore down to turn 13 they were greeted by yellow flags. They were being shown because Sebastian Vettel had spun out of the lead and out of the race due to a damaged wheel mounting. This meant that Jenson Button was leading the Australian Grand Prix, just as he had done for Brawn in 2009.

For the next few laps it was just Robert Kubica’s Renault in between the two McLaren’s upfront.

But on lap 35 McLaren pulled Hamilton into the pits to change his tyres again. This was to prove costly and in effect gifted victory to his team-mate Button.

A vast majority of the rest of the race saw Button taking it easy out on his own. Then came Kubica followed by Massa and Alonso. These three just couldn’t keep Hamilton, Webber and Rosberg from closing them down.

With six laps to go all six drivers were in a train, but nobody could find the speed to be able to pass one another.

Something had to give.

And on lap 56 of 58, it did.

Hamilton had pulled out to try and pass Alonso around the outside of turn 13. But Alonso kept the corner and Hamilton tried to feed back into the train. He was then punted of the track and into the gravel by Mark Webber, ruining great drives by both drivers. Both got going again, but all was lost in terms of passing the Ferraris.

Button won his first race since Turkey ’09 by 12 seconds from Robert Kubica, with Felipe Massa in third. The remaining points paying positions were taken by: Alonso (Ferrari), Rosberg (Mercedes), Hamilton (McLaren), Liuzzi (Force India), Barrichello (Williams), Webber (Red Bull) and Schumacher (Mercedes).

Ever since Bahrain people have been saying that F1 is boring. These people will now surely be eating steaming hot humble pie. This was a fantastic race, and well worth getting up at 05:45 for.

PS: Well done to young Jamie Alguersuari, 20, (Toro Rosso) for keeping Schumacher, 41,  behind him for a vast majority of the race. Also well done to HRT and Chandhok for finishing their first race.

Drivers’ Standings

  1. Alonso 37pts
  2. Massa 33pts
  3. Button 31pts
  4. Hamilton 23pts
  5. Rosberg 20pts
  6. Kubica 18pts
  7. Vettel 12pts
  8. Schumacher 9pts
  9. Liuzzi 8pts
  10. Webber 6pts

 

Constructors’ Standings

  1. Ferrari 70pts
  2. McLaren 54pts
  3. Mercedes 29pts
  4. Renault 18pts
  5. Red Bull 18pts
  6. Force India 8pts
  7. Williams 5pts

JENSON BUTTON WILL DRIVE FOR McLAREN NEXT YEAR WITH LEWIS HAMILTON!!

He has finally put me and millions of other fans out of our misery and signed for the best team on the grid.

We’ll have many first and perks in 2010, such as:

  • Having the numbers 1 & 2 on our cars.
  • For the first time ever, having the reigning and previous World Champions in a driver line up.
  • Having two British World Champions in the same team for the first time since Jim Clark and Graham Hill for Lotus in 1968.
  • Having two World Champions in the same team since Senna and Prost in 1989 – for McLaren

In other F1 news, 2007 Champion Kimi Raikkonen will be racing in the WRC next year. Good luck Kimi, and try to stay in one piece.

Next Blog, I’ll have a complete list of the 32 teams who will be in the 2010 World Cup.